Replotting Performance Conference Schedule

Conference Schedule

All events take place at the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center, located at
275 N Jordan Avenue on Indiana University’s Bloomington Campus.

Friday, March 25th
REGISTRATION AND OPENING EVENTS
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
Registration Table Open Theatre Art Gallery

6:30 pm-7:15 pm
Pre-Show Talk and hors d’oeuvres* Theatre Art Gallery
Featuring: Peter Gil-Sheridan, Mauricio Miranda, and Bruce Walsh

7:30 pm-10:00 pm
Performance 1: Wells-Metz Theatre
Occupants by Mauricio Miranda

Saturday, March 26th
BREAKFAST AND DEPARTMENTAL WELCOME
8:45 am-9:20 am
Breakfast* DeVault Lobby

9:20 am-9:25 am
Welcome A201

PANEL PRESENTATIONS
9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 1a: Moving Through Language and Body A201
1. “Kinetic Image Schema – Performance Moving Through Metaphors in Windstorm”
Eric Heaps, Ph.D. Candidate in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “From choreo-singularity to choreo-anatomy: dancing the body-score of Becoming”
Laura Potrovic, Ph.D. Student in Theatre Studies, University of Paris 3- Sorbonne Nouvelle
3. “Space Animator: A ‘Bodymind’ Finds Flow with Suzuki Movement”
Justin Rincker, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Bridget Sundin, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 1b: Women, Politics, and Transformation Through Narrative A152
1. “Nationalist Mythology and Yeats’ Cyclical View of History”
Miriam Poole, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. ““I love dirty stories’: Lost, Happy Voices and Female Narrative Transformation”
Susannah Stengel, M.A. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
3. “The Pursuit of Identity by Women in The Force of Change and In the Blood”
Huihui Huang, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

11:00 am-12:00 pm
Panel 2: Practice as Research Roundtable: Antigone A 201
Panelists: Katie Horwitz, M.F.A. Student in Directing, Indiana University
Ashley Dillard, M.F.A. Student in Acting, Indiana University
Liz Shea, Associate Professor & Director of IU Contemporary Dance Program, Indiana University
Adam McLean, Assistant Professor of Movement & Stage Combat, Indiana University
Moderator: Bridget Sundin, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

12:00 pm-2:00 pm
Lunch

2:00 pm- 3:00pm
Performance/Roundtable 2: A201
“‘In Some Other Life’; Methods of Adaptation in Michael John LaChiusa’s Hello Again”
Joshua Robinson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Performers: Joey Birchler, Kayla Marie Eilers, Christian Fary, Mia Fitgibbon, Jimmy Hogan, Kaitlyn Mayse, Scott Van Wye, &
Michelle Zink; Amanda Li (Musical Direction), Kaitlyn Louise Smith (Choreography)
Moderator: Joe Stollenwerk

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 3a: Sheep, Sacrifice, Scotland, and Shootin’ A152
1. “Stage Violence as Religion, Ritual, Sacrifice”
Tom Oldham, Ph.D., Independent Scholar
2. “Performing Populism: A Play, a Pie, and a Pint”
Deana Nichols, Ph.D., Independent Scholar
3. “Annie Oakley, Folk Heroine and Actress”
Katherine A. Johnson, Ph.D. Student, Communication & Culture, Indiana University
4. “Disruptive Presences: Talking to Sheep in the Brome Abraham and Isaac”
Abby Ang, Ph.D. Student, English, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 3b: Verbal Art as Performance A201
1. “‘Wait. What did You Just Say?!’ Using Irving Goffman’s Expression Games To Analyze a Magic Performance”
Andres Lopez, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “Ethics and Ethnography: An Attempt in Understanding Dialect and Transcription”
Lora Smith, Ph.D. Student, Communication & Culture, Indiana University
3. “The Establishment and Maintenance of Short-Term Joking Relationships”
Sarah Campbell, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Dr. John H. McDowell, Professor of Folklore, Indiana University

4:15 pm-4:45 pm
Snack Break* DeVault Lobby

4:45-4:55 pm
Presentation of Essay Prize A201
Dr. Jennifer Goodlander

5:00-6:00 pm
Panel 4: Bodies in Performance A201
1. “A Concrete Utopia: The Call of Authenticity and Hope in Gay Verbatim Theatre”
Brennan Murphy, B.A. Student in Theatre, Indiana University
2. “The Actor’s Verse: An Analysis of The Second Shepherd’s Play”
Alexis DeSollar, B.F.A. Student in Acting, Millikin University
Panel Chair: Andrés López, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

6:00-7:30 pm
Catered Dinner * DeVault Lobby

Sunday, March 27th
8:30-9:15
Breakfast* DeVault Lobby

9:15 am-10:30 am
Panel 5: Race and Gender in Performance A201
1. “‘Help Us Stand Up Proudly Again’ – Lao She’s Love and Revolution”
Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “Ramleela in Kangra Valley of Himalaya”
Chitra Upadhyaya, Freelance Journalist, University of Pune, India
3. “The Re-Construction of Gender –– Masculinized Women’s Body in the Chinese Model Opera”
Weiyu Li, M.A. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Andrés López, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

10:45am- 11:45am
Keynote Address A201
“Sites of Possibilities: Converging Research and Creative Practice in Our Own Work”
Dr. Julia Listengarten, Professor of Theatre, University of Central Florida

11:45am-12:00pm
Closing Remarks A201

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Photos from the 2014 Cultural Indigestion Conference

Everyone enjoyed the 2014 Art@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference. Papers, performances, and a roundtable were held to discuss the importance of intercultural theatre and performance practice. Here are a few pictures of the various events that made the conference successful!

 

Cultural Indigestion Symposium Schedule

ART@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference

ART@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference

Indiana University Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance

Cultural Indigestion
3rd Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies

All events are in the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center, 275 N. Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405, with the exception of Panel 1 which is located at the Mathers Museum of World Cultures, 416 N. Indiana Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47408. There is free parking across the street from the theatre building, on the upper level of the Jordan Avenue Garage.

Friday, December 12
REGISTRATION AND OPENING EVENTS
3:30 pm-4:30 pm
Registration Table Open……………………………………………….Michaels Lobby

4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Panel 1: Mathers Museum Exhibit Opening – Still/Moving………..……Mathers Museum

6:00 pm-7:30 pm
Catered Dinner………..……………………………………………Lee Norvelle Center

8:00 pm-10:00 pm
Performance 1: Staged Reading of an Adaptation………………………….Studio Theatre
The Poisonwood Bible written and directed by Joe Stollenwerk

Saturday, December 13
BREAKFAST AND DEPARTMENTAL WELCOME
8:45 am-9:20 am
Bagel Breakfast………………….…………………………………….Michaels Lobby

9:20 am-9:25 am
Welcome.………………………………………………………………Studio Theatre
Dr. Ronald Wainscott
Director of Graduate Studies and Head of Theatre History, Theory, and Literature

PANEL PRESENTATIONS

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 2a: Re- and Un-Known Musicals…………………………………………Studio Theatre
1. Capitalism Induced Cannibalization and the Contemporary American Musical Revival of Chicago
Mike Rodriguez, Masters Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
2. When Hell Freezes Over, I’ll Skate: Vinnette Carroll’s Theatrical Melting Pot
Joe Stollenwerk, PhD Candidate in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
3. Singing Multiculturalism; Bilingualism and the 2009 Production of West Side Story
Joshua Robinson, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 2b: Transgressing Identity………………………….….………………….A 201
1. The Chinatown Cowboy: Re-masculating the Chinese Male Through the Drama of Frank Chin
Whit Emerson, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
2. Transgressive Dramaturgy in Prison-Based Theatre
Julie Rada, Raymond C. Morals Fellow, University of Utah
3. Challenging Gender in Anna and the Tropics
Andres Lopez, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
4. Chewing Up and Spitting Out a New White: Genet, Ward, Parks and the Absurd Terror of Whiteface
Susannah Stengel, Masters Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
11:00 am-12:35 pm
Panel 3: Practical Multiculturalism Roundtable…………………..………………A 201
Moderator: Sara Taylor, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
Panelists: Jennifer Goodlander, Assistant Professor of History,
Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Mauricio Miranda, MFA Student in Playwriting, Indiana University
Bridgette Dreher, MFA Student in Scenic Design, Indiana University
David Koté, MFA Student in Directing, Indiana University
Caroline Huerta, BFA Student in Musical Theatre, Indiana University

12:45 pm-1:45 pm
Performance 2: Performance of a Translation…………………………….Studio Theatre
I Didn’t Expect Such Humanity by Lucienne Guedes Fahrer
Translated and Directed by Eric “C” Heaps
(mature content – nudity)

1:45 pm-3:00 pm
BREAK FOR LUNCH

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 4a: Cultural Adaptation and Appropriation…………………………..Studio Theatre
1. War Bonnet: Racist and Sexualized Misappropriation of Native Dress
Emmie Pappa Eddy, Masters Student in Folklore, Indiana University
2. Rediscovering Shakespeare Through Translations
Brennan Murphy, Arts Management and Theatre & Drama Major, Indiana University
3. Thunder God: The Difficulties of Producing Chinese Theatre at an American University
Lucia Xioran Zhu, Theatre & Drama Major, Indiana University
3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 4b: Western Influences in Asia…………………………………….………A 201
1. Post-Colonial Indian Theatre
Jashodhara Sen, M.A. in Theatre Arts, Mumbai University
2. Brecht in China
Weiyu Li, Masters Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
3. Kim Jong-il on the Invention of Tradition and the Art of Propaganda
Sara Taylor, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

4:15 pm-4:30 pm
Snack Break………………………………………………………Theatre West Alcove

4:30-4:45 pm
Presentation of Essay Prize…………………………………………….Studio Theatre
Dr. Jennifer Goodlander
Assistant Professor of History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

4:45-6:00 pm
Keynote Address
Processo Colaborativo de Criação (Collaborative Process of Creation)……Studio Theatre
Lucienne Guedes Fahrer, Professor of Playwriting, Escola Superior de Artes Celia Helena

6:00-7:30 pm
Dinner Break

7:30-9:00 pm
IU Theatre…………………………..…………………………….Wells-Metz Theatre
In the Red and Brown Water by Tarell Alvin McCraney
Directed by David Koté
Talkback with David Koté and dramaturg Eric “C” Heaps to follow
Keynote Address

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer
lucienneguedes@terra.com.br
Escola Superior de Artes Celia Helena
Professor of Playwriting

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer is a playwright, actor, director, professor, and researcher. She received her first degree from the University of São Paulo (USP) in Theatre with a specialization in Theory of the Theatre (2000) and her Master’s in Theatre (2011), also from USP. As an invited artist for the Teatro de Narradores, Cia., she put on her production of CIDADE CORO – CIDADE FIM – CIDADE REVERSO, as both playwright and co-driector. This production represented Brazil in the Messe Frankfurt in Germany in 2013. She was also an invited actor for Cia. Balagan (under the direction of Maria Thaís Lima Santos) in the project Cabras in 2013. She was a founding actress of Teatro da Vertigem, with whom she has put on the productions O Paraíso Perdido (1992), Apocalipse 1,11 (2000), e A última palavra é a penúltima 2.0 (2014). In 1998 she was invited to be principal of the Free School of Theatre in Santo André. She was an invited professor of the Theatre Department of ECA-USP in 2009, 2010, and 2013 and an invited director for the School of Dramatic Arts at USP in 2014. She is professor of playwriting at the Escola Superior de Artes Celia Helena em São Paulo. She has a wide range of experience in the arts, with an emphasis in playwriting and acting/directing, workign principally in the following areas: the creation process, playwriting, theatrical interpretation, the collaborative process, body techniques, vocal techniques, and performance. Currently she is working on her doctorate at USP under the direction of Sílvia Fernandes (beginning in 2012), with her work focusing on the creative processes in playwriting.

“A restauração e os deslocamentos da narratividade no teatro”
“Restoration and Displacement in the Narrativity of Theatre”

(corpo)realities | March 23-24 | Conference Weekend Itinerary

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All events are in the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center, 275 N. Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405. There is free parking across the street from the theatre building, on the upper level of the Jordan Avenue Garage.

Friday, March 22

Seminar

3:00 pm-4:45 pm

Rhizome: Choreography of a Moving Writing Self…………………………………………..Studio Theatre
Dr. Petra Kuppers, Professor of English, Theatre and Dance, & Women’s Studies, University of Michigan

Registration, Dinner, and a Show

5:00-6:00 pm

Registration Table Open……………………………………………………………………..Michaels Lobby

6:00-7:15 pm

Welcome Reception and Catered Dinner………..………………………………….Mezzanine Gallery

7:30-9:00 pm

IU Theatre’s At First Sight, A Repertory of New Plays……………Wells-Metz Theatre

(a love story) by Kelly P. Lusk, directed by Paul Daily
Kelly Lusk, MFA Playwriting Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

Saturday, March 23

Breakfast and Departmental Welcome

8:00-8:30 am

Bagel Breakfast…………………………………………………………………………………Michaels Lobby

8:30-8:35 am

Welcome.…..……………..……………..……………..……..……………..………………Wells-Metz Theatre
Professor Ronald Wainscott, Director of Graduate Studies, Head of Theatre History, Theory, & Literature

8:35-9:20 am

How to Tell (a love story) ………………………………………………………………Wells-Metz Theatre
Assistant Professor Ken Weitzman, Head of IU’s MFA Playwriting Program, interviews Kelly P. Lusk

Panel Presentations

9:30 am-10:45 am

Panel 1a: Dramaturgies of Difference………………………………………………Studio Theatre

1. Elephants on the Moors: The Abberant Patient’s Construction and Resistance in Joan Schenkar’s Signs of Life
Kim Hinton, PhD Candidate and Undergraduate Advisor in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

2. Sterno und Drang: The Connection Between Agency and Outlaw in Machinal, The Verge, and Out of Sterno
Julia Moriarty, PhD Student in Theatre, Wayne State University

3.  Reclaiming Wholeness: The Dramaturgy of Disability in D.W. Gregory’s Dirty Pictures
Bradley Stephenson, PhD Student in Theatre, University of Missouri

9:30 am-10:45 am

Panel 1b: Building Character with Cognitive Science…….…………………………A 201

4.  Their Bodies Are Also Mine: Extended Cognition Meets Becoming in a Physical Theatre Rehearsal Room
Slade Billew, PhD Student in Theatre & Film, Bowling Green State University
Angenette Spalink, PhD Student in Theatre & Film, Bowling Green State University (via Skype)

5.  Speaking Bodies: An Actor’s Awareness of Character
Tyler Eglen, MFA in Theatre Performance, Arizona State University

6.  From the Body Into the World: Viewpoints’ Use of the Actor’s Memory
Dr. Devin Malcolm, Adjunct Professor of Theatre, Slippery Rock University

11:00 am-12:15 pm

Panel 2a: The Effect of Affect on Othered Bodies…………………….………Studio Theatre

7.  Crip Identifications: The Affective Possibilities of Disability and Dance
Sami Schalk, PhD Candidate in Gender Studies, Indiana University

8.  Bodies in Motion: Photographic Sequences of Transsexual Bodies as Performance
Joshua Trey Barnett, MA Student in Communication and Culture, Indiana University

9.  Towards a Phenomenological Approach to the Black Performer’s Body in Brazilian Black Theatrical Practice
Gustavo Melo Cerqueira, MA Student in African & African Diaspora Studies, University of Texas – Austin

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(corpo)realities | Indiana University’s 2nd Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre & Performance Studies

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This March, the Department of Theatre and Drama will host its second annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies, a two-day event where young scholars from all over Europe and the Americas will convene in Bloomington to present their research in progress. This year’s conference is titled (corpo)realities and will feature academic paper presentations, demonstrations, actor-training workshops, and short performance pieces that actively question the role of embodiment and presence in art.

The conference is hosted by the Association for Research in Theatre at Indiana University, also known as ART@IU, a newly minted organization formed to foster a scholarly community for graduate and advanced undergraduate students to share their work in theatre and performance studies. With plans to host future conferences, guest speakers, and practice-as-research performances, ART@IU hopes to provide opportunities for Indiana University students to expand their professional networks by developing connections with other theatre researchers within the college and beyond.

Second-year Ph.D. students Sara Taylor and Eric “C” Heaps serve as the president and vice president of ART@IU and co-chaired this year’s conference with faculty support from Assistant Professors Ken Weitzman and Amy Cook. Their idea for the 2013 symposium grew out of a year-long conversation among students and faculty about the importance of attending to the physical reality of the actor’s body on stage and how that body can affect both the actor’s experience in playing a role and the audience’s understanding of it.

PhD Student Sara Taylor

PhD Student Sara Taylor

PhD Student Eric "C" Heaps

PhD Student Eric “C” Heaps

“Advances in scientific research continue to indicate that experience and cognition are bodily mediated,” Taylor noted. “That is to say that

the way that way we think is not just related to our individual physicalities, but is fundamentally structured by our experience of living in our bodies.”

Most scientists today do not consider the human mind and body to be separate, distinct entities and, according to Taylor, “When we take this into account, it becomes clear that the sensorimotor capacities of individuals, their size, shape, and ability to move through space can have a profound effect not just on what they feel, but how they know and understand the world.”

The project of the symposium’s participants is to relate this revelation to the theatre. How can innovations in artistic, scientific, and philosophical perspectives concerning the somatic structure our worldview in an age when technology infiltrates and organizes both the mental and physical tasks of daily life? The participants confront these questions from a variety of angles, presenting their work informed by current scholarship in theatre praxis, cognitive science, cultural theory and gender and disability studies.

This posits theatre and performance as a powerful tool for moving people at the cellular level, a happy idea shared by IU Theatre’s March mainstage productions in the new works series, At First Sight, which serve as the keystone of the symposium.

A scene from (a love story) by Kelly P. Lusk.

A scene from (a love story) by MFA Playwriting student Kelly P. Lusk. | Photo By Ben Tamir Rothenberg

“We planned the conference to begin with a performance of second-year M.F.A. Playwriting student Kelly Patrick Lusk’s new play (a love story), so that the presenters, who are from a variety of disciplines and cultural backgrounds, would have common ground,” Taylor said. On the morning of Saturday, March 23 the public portion of the symposium begins with a conversation featuring Lusk and Weitzman discussing the writing and revising of (a love story) and the process of new play development as an embodied experience.

Coming from more than a dozen universities in the United States, Canada, Europe, and South America, the participants in this year’s symposium truly fulfill ART@IU’s mission to expand professional networks. “It was important to us to extend an invitation to people studying performance acts from many different perspectives,” Taylor said. “We wanted theatre scholars, practitioners, and critics, but we also wanted to meet with people who read performance as a new literature, or as rhetoric, or as a physiological function of the body.”

The keynote speaker for the symposium shares interdisciplinary interests as well. Dr. Petra Kuppers is Professor of English, Theatre and Dance, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. As a performance maker and community artist as well as a self-proclaimed witnessing critic, theorist, and a disability culture activist, Kuppers cites her journey as an artist as emerging from a “passionate exploration of performance ethics and community building.”

Petra Kuppers

Community artist and activist Dr. Petra Kuppers, Professor of English, Theatre & Dance, and Women’s Studies at University of Michigan.

“What we call ‘art’ is up for grabs, needs to be re-thought, re-created, every time we step into the river of practice,” she notes. “I know this because as a disabled dancer living with pain and fatigue, I have to subvert the ordinary, have fun in unusual spaces, and find time out of time.” For over twenty years, Kuppers has engaged community participants gently and with thought-in-process work. Some of these workshops happened in women’s centers, hospices, mental health self-help groups, youth groups, traditional Weavers and Knitters Guilds, with politicians, with people labeled as ‘developmentally disabled’, with cancer survivors, in National Parks, in abandoned buildings, and on the beach.

In addition to teaching, Kuppers is also Artistic Director of The Olimpias, a performance research project that investigates intersections between community art, identity politics, and (new) media. Some of her past works include Disability and Contemporary Performance: Bodies on Edge (Routledge, 2003), The Scar of Visibility: Medical Performances and Contemporary Art (University of Minnesota Press, 2007), and Community Performance: An Introduction (Routledge, 2007). Her most recent book, Disability Culture and Community Performance: Find a Strange and Twisted Shape (Routledge 2011) won the American Society for Theatre Research’s 2011 Sally Banes Prize.

(corpo)realities will convene at the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center with an evening performance of (a love story) on Friday, March 22.  The student presentations will commence in the morning on Saturday, March 23 and continue through the keynote speech in the late afternoon.  All events are open to the public, though seating is limited.

Tickets for (a love story) may be purchased through the box office, or by visiting theatre.indiana.edu.

(corpo)realities Keynote Speaker Announced | Dr. Petra Kuppers, University of Michigan

Petra Kuppers and Neil Marcus, 2008.

Kuppers performs with her lover and fellow disabled dancer, Neil Marcus, during a public reading of Cripple Poetics: A Love Story, a poetry book that the two co-authored in 2008.  | Photograph by Timothy Wells Householder.

ART@IU is thrilled to announce that the keynote speaker for our upcoming Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies will be Dr. Petra Kuppers, Professor of English, Women’s Studies Art and Design, & Theatre at the University of Michigan.

Kuppers is a community performance artist, and a self-proclaimed witnessing critic, theorist, and a disability culture activist who cites her journey as an artist as emerging from a “passionate exploration of performance ethics and community building.” For over twenty years, Kuppers has engaged community participants gently and with thought-in-process work:

 “What we call ‘art’ is up for grabs, needs to be re-thought, re-created, every time we step into the river of practice. I know this because as a disabled dancer living with pain and fatigue, I have to subvert the ordinary, have fun in unusual spaces, and find time out of time.”

Some of these workshops happened in women’s centers, hospices, mental health self-help groups, youth groups, traditional Weavers and Knitters Guilds, with politicians, with people labeled as ‘developmentally disabled’, with cancer survivors, in National Parks, in abandoned buildings, and on the beach.

In addition to teaching, Kuppers is also Artistic Director of The Olimpias, a performance research project that investigates intersections between community art, identity politics, and (new) media. Some of her past works include Disability and Contemporary Performance: Bodies on Edge (Routledge, 2003), The Scar of Visibility: Medical Performances and Contemporary Art (University of Minnesota Press, 2007), and Community Performance: An Introduction (Routledge, 2007). Her most recent book, Disability Culture and Community Performance: Find a Strange and Twisted Shape (Palgrave 2011), which explores arts-based research methods, won the American Society for Theatre Research’s 2011 Sally Banes Prize. She leads The Olimpias, a performance research collective. She is currently at work on two projects: a study of disability in Australian and New Zealand/Aotearoan contexts, and a study on social somatics, performance and embodiment.

Her keynote address will be titled “Cultural Work and the Somatic: New Publics of Community Performance

Community-based performance practices enter the archive of performance and theatre studies usually through discussions of organizational forms, through analyses of representations, or through ethnographic interview methodologies assessing levels of agency and participation. This talk offers a different lens on community performance in the public sphere. It focuses on contemporary somatic-based training methods and their effects on how energy circulates among project participants and audience members. As a witnessing critic, how can I discern somatic effects and articulate my own embodied responses? How can transformatory processes emerge in co-witnessing and co-participation? If we think through the queries relational art discourse offers us, how can we find methods of creating and witnessing performance work that make relationality viscerally available, and challenge sociopolitical formations at the level of embodiment? These questions form the desirous horizon of this paper, which will focus on a number of contemporary public performance works, including GAWK by Rollercoaster Theatre, performed in Federation Square, Melbourne, Australia. Rollercoaster Theatre is a group formed out of graduates of a vocational theatre-training course for people with a broad range of disabilities and learning needs.

(corpo)realities: Keynote Address

Saturday, March 24, 2013 | 5:30 pm | Studio Theatre
Lee Norvelle Theatre & Drama Center
275 N. Jordan Ave. | Bloomington, Indiana | 47405

War Making Bodies: Indiana University’s 1st Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies

Join us Saturday, December 10 as the department hosts its first annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies, where young scholars from all over North America will convene in Bloomington to present their research in progress. This event is open to the public, though seating is limited.

Ellen McLaughlin

Dr. Rhonda Blair, Professor of Theatre & Acting, Southern Methodist University.

The conference has been organized by PhD candidate Neal Utterback and first-year PhD student Sara Taylor, with faculty support from assistant professor Amy Cook. The conference is titled “War Making Bodies,” and will feature academic paper presentations, demonstrations, a short play relating to the effects of war on the human body and the way those bodies are then represented in culture. The event also features a keynote address by Dr. Rhonda Blair.

Blair is president of the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR) and Professor of Theatre and Acting at the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University. Her main areas of interest include acting theory—particularly looking at applications of cognitive science to the acting process—performance studies, theatre and politics, feminism and theatre, alternative performance, and Chekhov. Her book, The Actor, Image, and Action: Acting and Cognitive Neuroscience, is being used by acting teachers in both the U.S. and England.

Blair bases her research in cognitive science to support the belief that consciousness emerges in the interplay between language, thought, and emotions/feelings, which are firmly rooted in the body and its experiences in the world. Blair holds editorial board positions on Theatre Topics, Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism, and has also been the recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities.


WarMakingBodies_Poster2Paper Presentations on Saturday, December 10:

All events are in the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center 275 N. Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN  47405. Those driving to the event should park across the street from the theatre on the upper level of the Jordan Avenue Garage.
8:30-8:40 am
Welcome from Department Chair, Jonathan Michaelson…..Wells-Metz Theatre

8:40-9:20 am
Q&A with Lysistrata director, Fontaine Syer ………………………Wells-Metz Theatre

9:30-10:30 am
Panel 1a: War Making Bodies…………………………………………………………Studio Theatre

Erection as Weapon and Wound in the Plays of Edward Albee
Joe Stollenwerk, PhD Student, Department of Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

• The Battlefield as Stage: Performing Hyper Masculinity and Femininity in a Wartime Environment
Carrie Bunch, PhD Candidate, Theatre, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

• The “Girl-American Hero”:  A Sculptural Analysis of The Feminine Body Portrayed in The GI Joe Toy Line
David Reed, MFA Candidate, Directing, Baylor University

9:30-10:30 am
Panel 1b: The Body Politic……………………………………………………………………….A 201

“Let Them Send Rockets, We’ll Send Them a Good Song:” Civilian Bodies in Performance at the Anti-NATO Concerts in Belgrade
Mina Sohaj, PhD Student, Theatre, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Sidney Kingsley’s The Patriots: A Dramatic Parallel between Eighteenth-Century America and WWII
Emily Davis, PhD Candidate, Theatre, The Ohio State University

•  Brecht’s Mother Courage: Integrating War, Religion and Economics
Dan Ciba, MA Student, Theatre, Villanova University

10:45-11:45 am
Panel 2a: Fighting Words……………………………………………………………………………..Studio Theatre

War of Words: Battling for the Polity in García Gutiérrez’s El Trovador
Kyle Davis, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

King Richard III, Shakespeare’s “bunch back toad” persists in the public mind
Jenna Johnson, MA Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

‘A Singing Army Cannot Be Beaten’: Four Minute Men Speakers in Song, a Historical and Literary Perspective
Amy Rubens, PhD Student, English, Indiana University

10:45-11:45 am
Panel 2b: (Un)Making  Bodies…………………………………………………………………………….A 201

Exorcising The Audience:  Shakespeare, Harsnett, and the Power of the Actor
Timothy Pyles, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

The Rule(s) of Violence on the Early Modern and Postmodern English Stage
Thomas A. Oldham, PhD Candidate, Indiana University

“If we are what people say we are, let us take delight in the blood of men”: watching violence and/or feeling pain in theatres of war from the Classical to the Renaissance era
Jessica Tooker, PhD Student, English, Indiana University

12:00-1:00 pm
Panel 3a: Myth Making…………………………………………………………………………….Studio Theatre

• The Dis/Embodiment of Myth: De/Mythologization in the Work of Natália Correia
Eric “C” Heaps, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

Looking to the Heavens:  Warriors, Gods, and a Tragic Optic
Jeremy Gordon, PhD Student, Communications & Culture, Indiana University

Memorial Conflict: Titus Andronicus, Trojan Myths, and Collective Memory
James McClure, PhD Student, English, University of Ottawa

12:00-1:00 pm
Panel 3b: Bodies Making War…………………………………………………………………………….A 201

Resurrecting Warriors: Suzuki’s Movement Method and the Re-Development of ‘Acting Bodies’
Justin Rincker, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

War Making Scotsmen: The National Theatre of Scotland’s Black Watch
Deana Nichols, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

2:30-4:00 pm

• Coward Land; A New Play …………………………………………………………………………….Studio Theatre
David Marcia, PhD Student, Theatre, University of Missouri-Columbia

4:30-5:00 pm
Award presentation and introduction by Amy Cook………………………………………………………………………….A201

5:00-6:00 pm
Keynote Address by Dr. Rhonda Blair………………………………………………………………………….A201