Photos from the 2014 Cultural Indigestion Conference

Everyone enjoyed the 2014 Art@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference. Papers, performances, and a roundtable were held to discuss the importance of intercultural theatre and performance practice. Here are a few pictures of the various events that made the conference successful!

 

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CMCL’s Joshua Trey Barnett is the (corpo)realities Symposium Essay Prize Winner

We are pleased to announce that Joshua Trey Barnett, MA Student in Indiana University’s Department of Communication & Culture is the winner of the  2013 Indiana University Graduate Symposium on Theatre & Performance Studies Essay Prize. His paper “Photographic Sequences of Transsexual Bodies as Performance” investigated Joshua Riverdale’s “Gender Outlaw: My Physical Evolution on Testosterone,” a 110- photograph sequence of the photographer’s body in various states of somatic transition.

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Screenshot from Joshua Riverdale’s FTM Transition Blog, “Gender Outlaw: My Physical Evolution on Testosterone,” the case study at the heart of Barnett’s prize-winning paper.

In his paper presented at the 2013 (corpo)realities conference sponsored by ART@IU, Joshua demonstrates the productive potential of consecutive images to render the prolonged process of transition visible. According to Joshua:

“Riverdale’s photographic sequence straddles the divide between embodied performance and archival documentation, and functions to perform his transition in a coherent way that relies on and refers to the corporeal. This analysis offers a generative framework for re-imagining the relationships between visual rhetoric and performance, representation and performativity, image and flesh.”

The prize comes with recognition in Department of Theatre and Drama’s various publications and a $200 stipend sponsored by the Indiana University Department of Theatre & Drama and ART@IU.

JoshuaTreyBarnett

IU CMCL Student, Joshua Trey Barnett

Joshua Trey Barnett is an associate instructor and graduate student in the Department of Communication and Culture at Indiana University Bloomington. His research program centers on questions of (in)visibility with an emphasis on queer and environmental visual rhetorics. Invisible processes such as climate change, community pollution, and somatic transitions constitute the primary sites of Barnett’s research and attention. He theorizes at the intersections of rhetorical, performance, and critical cultural studies. He is also a photographer and queer activist.

Seminar: “Rhizome: Choreography of a Moving Writing Self” with Dr. Petra Kuppers

The Association for Research in Theatre at Indiana University (ART@IU) and The Department of Theatre & Drama cordially invite faculty and graduate students to participate in:

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“Rhizome: Choreography of a Moving Writing Self”

A seminar on disability culture and community performance conducted by artist, scholar, and dancer Petra Kuppers

Friday, March 22, 2013 | 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Studio Theatre, Theatre Building, 2nd Floor

SPACE IS LIMITED; please RSVP to taylosar@indiana.edu to attend. Two readings from Petra’s most recent book Disability Culture and Community Performance: Find a Strange and Twisted Shape (Palgrave 2011) will be made available to participants in advance of the seminar.

PETRA KUPPERS is Professor of English, Theatre and Dance, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. A performance maker, community artist, and self-proclaimed witnessing critic, theorist, and a disability culture activist, Kuppers cites her journey as an artist as emerging from a “passionate exploration of performance ethics and community building.”

“What we call ‘art’ is up for grabs, needs to be re-thought, re-created, every time we step into the river of practice,” she writes.

“I know this because as a disabled dancer living with pain and fatigue, I have to subvert the ordinary, have fun in unusual spaces, and find time out of time.” For over twenty years, Kuppers has engaged community participants gently and with thought-in-process work. Some of these workshops happened in women’s centers, hospices, mental health self-help groups, youth groups, traditional Weavers and Knitters Guilds, with politicians, with people labeled as ‘developmentally disabled’, with cancer survivors, in National Parks, in abandoned buildings, and on the beach.

In addition to teaching, Kuppers is also Artistic Director of The Olimpias, a performance research project that investigates intersections between community art, identity politics, and (new) media. Some of her past works include Disability and Contemporary Performance: Bodies on Edge (Routledge, 2003), The Scar of Visibility: Medical Performances and Contemporary Art (University of Minnesota Press, 2007), and Community Performance: An Introduction (Routledge, 2007). Her most recent book, Disability Culture and Community Performance: Find a Strange and Twisted Shape (Palgrave 2011) won the American Society for Theatre Research’s 2011 Sally Banes Prize.

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This event is a part of (corpo)realities, the second annual Indiana University Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies, a two-day event where young scholars from all over Europe and the Americas will convene in Bloomington to present their research in progress. This year’s conference will feature academic paper presentations, demonstrations, actor-training workshops, and short performance pieces that actively question the role of embodiment and presence in art.

The conference is hosted by the Department of Theatre & Drama in affiliation with the Association for Research in Theatre at IndianaUniversity, (ART@IU), a newly minted organization formed to foster a scholarly community for graduate and advanced undergraduate students to share their work in theatre and performance studies. With plans to host future conferences, guest speakers, and practice-as-research performances, ART@IU hopes to provide opportunities for Indiana University students to expand their professional networks by developing connections with other theatre researchers within the college and beyond.

(corpo)realities will convene at the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center with an evening performance of (a love story) on Friday, March 22.  The student presentations will commence in the morning on Saturday, March 23 and continue through the keynote speech in the late afternoon. All events are open to the public, though seating is limited.  More information about the conference and tickets for (a love story) may be  found online at theatre.indiana.edu.

Jan 31: Inaugural Timothy Wiles Memorial Lecturer is Beth Holmgren

The Polish Studies Center in cooperation with the Departments of Theatre & Drama, English, Comparative Literature, and Slavic Languages & Literature presents The Inaugural Timothy Wiles Memorial Lecture:

“Shows of Solidarity: Cabaret in Interwar Warsaw”

January 31 2013, 7:00 pm
Indiana Memorial Union, Georgian Room

For more information, check out the Polish Studies Center’s homepage.

Dr. Beth Holmgren, Duke University


BETH HOLMGREN is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies and Theater Studies at Duke University. She received her Ph.D. in Slavic Literatures from Harvard University and is author of, among other books, Women’s Works in Stalin’s Time, editor (with Helena Goscilo) of Poles Apart: Women in Modern Polish Culture, and translator and editor (with Helena Goscilo) of The Keys to Happiness by Anastasya Verbitskaya. Her most recent book, Starring Madame Modjeska: On Tour in Poland and America (2011, Indiana University Press) details the life of Poland’s leading nineteenth-century actress, Helena Modrzejewska, who emigrated to southern California in 1876 to establish a utopian commune, but ended up as a leading Shakespearean actress on the American stage, playing opposite such celebrated actors as Edwin Booth and Maurice Barrymore. The book traces Modjeska’s fabulous life and career from her illegitimate birth in Krakow, to her successive reinventions of herself as a star in both Poland and America, and finally to her enduring legacy.

War Making Bodies: Indiana University’s 1st Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies

Join us Saturday, December 10 as the department hosts its first annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies, where young scholars from all over North America will convene in Bloomington to present their research in progress. This event is open to the public, though seating is limited.

Ellen McLaughlin

Dr. Rhonda Blair, Professor of Theatre & Acting, Southern Methodist University.

The conference has been organized by PhD candidate Neal Utterback and first-year PhD student Sara Taylor, with faculty support from assistant professor Amy Cook. The conference is titled “War Making Bodies,” and will feature academic paper presentations, demonstrations, a short play relating to the effects of war on the human body and the way those bodies are then represented in culture. The event also features a keynote address by Dr. Rhonda Blair.

Blair is president of the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR) and Professor of Theatre and Acting at the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University. Her main areas of interest include acting theory—particularly looking at applications of cognitive science to the acting process—performance studies, theatre and politics, feminism and theatre, alternative performance, and Chekhov. Her book, The Actor, Image, and Action: Acting and Cognitive Neuroscience, is being used by acting teachers in both the U.S. and England.

Blair bases her research in cognitive science to support the belief that consciousness emerges in the interplay between language, thought, and emotions/feelings, which are firmly rooted in the body and its experiences in the world. Blair holds editorial board positions on Theatre Topics, Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism, and has also been the recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities.


WarMakingBodies_Poster2Paper Presentations on Saturday, December 10:

All events are in the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center 275 N. Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN  47405. Those driving to the event should park across the street from the theatre on the upper level of the Jordan Avenue Garage.
8:30-8:40 am
Welcome from Department Chair, Jonathan Michaelson…..Wells-Metz Theatre

8:40-9:20 am
Q&A with Lysistrata director, Fontaine Syer ………………………Wells-Metz Theatre

9:30-10:30 am
Panel 1a: War Making Bodies…………………………………………………………Studio Theatre

Erection as Weapon and Wound in the Plays of Edward Albee
Joe Stollenwerk, PhD Student, Department of Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

• The Battlefield as Stage: Performing Hyper Masculinity and Femininity in a Wartime Environment
Carrie Bunch, PhD Candidate, Theatre, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

• The “Girl-American Hero”:  A Sculptural Analysis of The Feminine Body Portrayed in The GI Joe Toy Line
David Reed, MFA Candidate, Directing, Baylor University

9:30-10:30 am
Panel 1b: The Body Politic……………………………………………………………………….A 201

“Let Them Send Rockets, We’ll Send Them a Good Song:” Civilian Bodies in Performance at the Anti-NATO Concerts in Belgrade
Mina Sohaj, PhD Student, Theatre, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Sidney Kingsley’s The Patriots: A Dramatic Parallel between Eighteenth-Century America and WWII
Emily Davis, PhD Candidate, Theatre, The Ohio State University

•  Brecht’s Mother Courage: Integrating War, Religion and Economics
Dan Ciba, MA Student, Theatre, Villanova University

10:45-11:45 am
Panel 2a: Fighting Words……………………………………………………………………………..Studio Theatre

War of Words: Battling for the Polity in García Gutiérrez’s El Trovador
Kyle Davis, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

King Richard III, Shakespeare’s “bunch back toad” persists in the public mind
Jenna Johnson, MA Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

‘A Singing Army Cannot Be Beaten’: Four Minute Men Speakers in Song, a Historical and Literary Perspective
Amy Rubens, PhD Student, English, Indiana University

10:45-11:45 am
Panel 2b: (Un)Making  Bodies…………………………………………………………………………….A 201

Exorcising The Audience:  Shakespeare, Harsnett, and the Power of the Actor
Timothy Pyles, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

The Rule(s) of Violence on the Early Modern and Postmodern English Stage
Thomas A. Oldham, PhD Candidate, Indiana University

“If we are what people say we are, let us take delight in the blood of men”: watching violence and/or feeling pain in theatres of war from the Classical to the Renaissance era
Jessica Tooker, PhD Student, English, Indiana University

12:00-1:00 pm
Panel 3a: Myth Making…………………………………………………………………………….Studio Theatre

• The Dis/Embodiment of Myth: De/Mythologization in the Work of Natália Correia
Eric “C” Heaps, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

Looking to the Heavens:  Warriors, Gods, and a Tragic Optic
Jeremy Gordon, PhD Student, Communications & Culture, Indiana University

Memorial Conflict: Titus Andronicus, Trojan Myths, and Collective Memory
James McClure, PhD Student, English, University of Ottawa

12:00-1:00 pm
Panel 3b: Bodies Making War…………………………………………………………………………….A 201

Resurrecting Warriors: Suzuki’s Movement Method and the Re-Development of ‘Acting Bodies’
Justin Rincker, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

War Making Scotsmen: The National Theatre of Scotland’s Black Watch
Deana Nichols, PhD Student, Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

2:30-4:00 pm

• Coward Land; A New Play …………………………………………………………………………….Studio Theatre
David Marcia, PhD Student, Theatre, University of Missouri-Columbia

4:30-5:00 pm
Award presentation and introduction by Amy Cook………………………………………………………………………….A201

5:00-6:00 pm
Keynote Address by Dr. Rhonda Blair………………………………………………………………………….A201