Keynote Speaker Lucienne Guedes Fahrer Workshops and Lecture

The Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance, The Association for Research in Theater at IU, and Indiana University Student Association invite you to workshops and a lecture by:

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer  (University of São Paulo/Teatro da Vertigem)

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer

Workshop

“Working with Actors in Site-Specific Performance”

Tuesday, December 9, from 4:30 – 6:00 pm

Studio Theatre (Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center. 275 North Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN)

 

Lecture

“The Works of Lucienne Guedes Fahrer and the São Paulo Theatre Scene”

Wednesday, December 10, at 5:30 pm

A200 (Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center)

Workshop

“The Collaborative Playwriting Process”

Thursday, December 11, from 4:30 – 6:30 pm

Studio Theatre (Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center)

Another lecture, co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, will be offered in the Redbud Room of the Indiana Memorial Union, Wednesday, December 10, at 2:30 pm. This lecture will be in the Portuguese language and is entitled “O Processo Colaborativo de Criação.”

 

Distinguished Acting Teacher Visits IU Theatre

Robert Benedetti

Dr. Robert Benedetti on Acting and the Current State of Theatre, Film, and Television

Robert Benedetti, PhD is a distinguished teacher of theatre who has had a forty-year career as a professor, director, and producer, and is the author of six books on stage and film. He was Dean of the School of Theatre at the California Institute of the Arts and Chairman of the Acting Department at the Yale Drama School, and won three Emmys and the Peabody Award for his films for HBO.

Thursday, April 10 | 5:30 pm
The Studio Theatre
2nd Flr., Lee Norvelle Theatre & Drama Center


ROBERT BENEDETTI received his PhD from Northwestern University. After serving as Artistic Director of the Court Theatre in Chicago, he was an early member of Chicago’s Second City Theatre, and then taught for fifty years at the University of Wisconsin, Carnegie-Mellon University, The National Theatre School of Canada, and the University of California, Riverside.

He was Chairman of Theatre at York University in Toronto, Chairman of the Acting Program at the Yale Drama School, and for eight years Dean of Theatre at The California Institute of the Arts. He was until 2011 a tenured Full Professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Artistic Director of the Nevada Conservatory Theatre.

Benedetti has directed at many regional theatres, including the Tyrone Guthrie Theatre, Australia’s Melbourne Theatre Company, the Milwaukee, South Coast, and San Diego Repertory Theatres, the Oregon, Colorado, and Great Lakes Shakespeare festivals, and many others.

He has also worked in the art museum field, recreating the 1913 Futurist Opera VICTORY OVER THE SUN by Kasimir Malevich for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and has also created shows on German Expressionism and Russian Agitprop. His productions have appeared at the Berlin Festival, the Demeervart in Amsterdam, the Hirschhorn Museum at the Smithsonian, and the Brooklyn Academy. His films are in the permanent collection of MoMA and many other museums and university art departments.

He served as an advisor to the U. S. Department of Education and as a Fulbright Panelist. As President of Ted Danson’s Anasazi Productions at Paramount Studios, and later as an independent screenwriter/producer, he won three Best Picture Emmys, two Humanitas Prizes, and a Peabody Award for producing Miss Evers’ Boys and A Lesson Before Dying for HBO, and six other films. He most recently completed a screenplay for HBO on the 1885 Chicago Haymarket bombing.

Benedetti has also written six books on acting and film production, including The Actor At Work (10th edition), The Actor in You (5th edition), ACTION! Acting for Film and Television, and From Concept to Screen, an Overview of Film and TV Production.

In 2005 he received the Lifetime Career Achievement Award from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE). In 2012 he was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Theatre at the Kennedy Center.

This Friday 4/11 and next Friday 4/18  Robert Benedetti will ALSO be first in AD 060 from 1:00 to 3:00 and then in The Studio Theatre from 3:00 to 4:00.

Mar. 4: Spanish & Portuguese present Luís Madureira on Theatre in Mozambique

Microsoft Word - Madureira.docx 

“Where ‘God is like a Longing’: Theater and Social Vulnerability in Mozambique.”

Tuesday, March 4th — 4:30 pm
Georgian Room, Indiana Memorial Union

The result of research conducted in Maputo, Mozambique between February and December 2010, Professor Luís Madureira’s paper aims to understand how the sustained and diverse performance culture that has thrived in Mozambique since the early 1980s entails a novel and effective mode of exercising citizenship—to gauge the extent to which, for both spectators and theatre workers, drama constituted a powerful form of political participation.

Operating under the assumption that Mozambican theatre opened up spaces for the negotiation and re-articulation of ethnic, class and gender identifications both against and alongside dominant nationalist discourses, in the course of my investigation, I was compelled to rethink my hypotheses. In the paper I will be presenting, I will try to explain why I needed to revise my original hypothesis and will then attempt to broach an interrogation of how (and indeed whether), in the course of Mozambique’s tumultuous recent history, theater has succeeded in catalyzing, or at least symbolizing, social change and political participation in rural and peri-urban zones.

Luís Madureira

Dr. Luís Madureira, University of Wisconsin – Madison


LUÍS MADUREIRA earned his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of California at San Diego, and his major areas of specialization include Luso-Brazilian colonial and postcolonial studies, as well as Modernism and Modernity in Latin America, Africa and the Caribbean. He has written two books, Imaginary Geographies in Portuguese and Lusophone-African Literature: Narratives of Discovery and Empire (Mellen 2007), which studies figurations of empire, nation and revolution in Portuguese and Lusophone African literatures, and Cannibal Modernities: Postcoloniality and the Avant-garde in Caribbean and Brazilian Literature (University of Virginia Press  2005), a reexamination of the Brazilian and Caribbean avant-gardes from a postcolonial perspective. He has published several articles on topics ranging from Luso-Brazilian literature and cinema to early modern travel narratives and postcolonial theory. His current research focuses on Mozambican theatre and the politics of time in contemporary Lusophone fiction.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Department of Theater, Drama and Contemporary Dance, and IU’s African Studies Program.

Mar. 4: IU French & Italian Presents Dr. Georgia Cowart on Watteau and 18th C. French Opera

Performing a New France: Watteau, the Musical Stage, and the Burial of Louis XI

Tuesday, March 4th | 5:30 pm
Simon Music Building, Room 242
200 S. Jordan Ave. (behind the fountain)

Antoine Watteau (1684-1721) worked briefly as a set painter at the Paris Opera House around 1702-1703, and a number of his most well-known paintings can be explained via a series of pieces performed in the musical theater of that time. These works encode a critique of the increasingly unpopular rule of the aging Louis XIV, while offering utopian visions of a new France. Drawing on the opera, ballet, and commedia dell’arte, the presentation will examine the imagery of The French Comedians, The Italian Comedians, Mezzetin, and other works as they respond to and participate in a theatrical game of masks involving satire, parody, and allusion.

Dr. Georgia Cowart, Case Western University


GEORGIA COWART is Professor of Music at Case Western Reserve University. She has published three books and a number of articles on music, the arts, and cultural politics in early modern France. Her most recent book, The Triumph of Pleasure: Louis XIV and the Politics of Spectacle (University of Chicago Press, 2008), focused on the shifting intersections of the arts, ideology, and aesthetics at the court of Louis XIV and in the Parisian public sphere in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.  She is currently at work on a book manuscript, tentatively titled “Performing a New France: Watteau, Spectacle, and the Sunset of Absolutism.”

From 2007-09, Prof. Cowart served as Sylvan C. and Pamela Coleman Memorial Fund Senior Fellow in Art History at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and as guest curator of the Met exhibition “Watteau, Music & Theater” (Fall 2009). From 2011-12 she served as Marta Sutton Weeks Senior Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center.

This talk made possible by the kind sponsorship of the Mary-Margaret Barr Koon Fund of the Department of French & Italian, Department of the History of Art, the Renaissance Studies Program, Department of Theatre, Drama, & Contemporary Dance, IU’s Center for 18th-Century Studies, Department of Musicology

If you have a disability and need assistance, accommodations can be made to meet most needs. Please call (812) 855-5458.

Apr 10: Bruce McConachie to Deliver 2014 Albert Wertheim Lecture

The Indiana University Department of English announces the 4th Annual Albert Wertheim Lecture in Performance:

McConachie LectureTHE WERTHEIM SEMINAR IN PERFORMANCE fosters advanced work in theater, drama, and performance studies in the English Department and at IU. It honors the legacy and influence of Albert J. Wertheim, a leading scholar and supporter of the dramatic arts at Indiana University and elsewhere. Professor Wertheim received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1965 and taught at Princeton University before moving to Indiana in 1969, where he taught until the time of his death in 2003. The subjects of his published articles span the canon of Western drama and theatre: from Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, and James Shirley to Bertolt Brecht, Arthur Miller, Eugene O’Neill, William Inge, and many others.  He is the author of two books: The Dramatic Art of Athol Fugard: From South Africa to the World (2000) and Staging the War: American Drama and World War II (published posthumously, 2004).

Click here to find further information about Theatre/Performance Studies in the IU English Department.

Bruce McConachie

Dr. Bruce McConachie, University of Pittsburgh


BRUCE MCCONACHIE is a specialist in American theatre history, theatre historiography, and the intersection of cognitive science and theatre. His major books include, MelodramaticFormations, American Theater in the Culture of the Cold War, Interpreting the Theatrical Past (with Tom Postlewait), Theatre & Mind, and Engaging Audiences: A Cognitive Approach to Spectating in the Theatre. He is the co-editor (with F. Elizabeth Hart) of Performance and Cognition: Theatre Studies and the Cognitive Turn and the co-editor (with Blakey Vermeule) of the Palgrave series on Cognitive Studies in Literature and Performance. He has been the President of the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR) and a winner of its Distinguished Scholar Award. He is currently the Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Theatre Arts.

Sept. 26: Theatre Circle presents Dr. Alison Calhoun on Molière’s Imaginary Invalid

Courtesy of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France

“‘This Fatal Marriage’: The Critique of Opera in Molière’s Imaginary Invalid”

Molière’s Imaginary Invalid draws a very fine line between fact and fiction, since it not only presents illness and dying as its subject matter, it has gone down in the history of theater as the play during which its dramatist, playing the title role, met his own death. But Molière’s final performance was not just brought about because of bad health. His fame and the future of his comedies were also severely threatened by his once collaborator, turned rival, the opera composer Lully. This talk will look at how the more obvious subject matter of quack doctors and ridiculous medicine doubled as a clever strike at Lully and the rise of opera.

Dr. Alison Calhoun, Department of French & Italian

Dr. Alison Calhoun, Department of French & Italian

Alison Calhoun is Assistant Professor of French in IU’s Department of French and Italian. Her research focuses on the cultural and intellectual history of the Renaissance and extends to the 17th and 18th centuries to study genre, reception (theater), and morality. Her approach is interdisciplinary (philosophy and literature, music and literature) and often fits into the categories of history of the book, reception theory, and genre studies. Her forthcoming book, A Transverse Self: Montaigne and the Lives of the Philosophers, situates Montaigne and Diogenes Laertius in the history of life writing in the Renaissance and Classical Age in France.

In Calhoun’s latest research project, Motion and Emotion in Early Modern French Drama, she explores the reading, staging and stagecraft of composite drama (court ballet, machine plays, comedy-ballets, and opera). With key authors like Balthasar de Beaujoyeulx, Honorat de Bueil de Racan, Honoré D’Urfé, Jean Mairet, Pierre Corneille, Isaac de Benserade and Philippe Quinault, she aims to show that the libretto, parallel to and concurrently with the novel, trained readers not only to imagine greater fictional possibilities than before, but also to feel (sometimes to practice) more diverse emotions.