Pictures from the ART@IU Replotting Performance Conference 2016

Replotting Performance Conference Schedule

Conference Schedule

All events take place at the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center, located at
275 N Jordan Avenue on Indiana University’s Bloomington Campus.

Friday, March 25th
REGISTRATION AND OPENING EVENTS
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
Registration Table Open Theatre Art Gallery

6:30 pm-7:15 pm
Pre-Show Talk and hors d’oeuvres* Theatre Art Gallery
Featuring: Peter Gil-Sheridan, Mauricio Miranda, and Bruce Walsh

7:30 pm-10:00 pm
Performance 1: Wells-Metz Theatre
Occupants by Mauricio Miranda

Saturday, March 26th
BREAKFAST AND DEPARTMENTAL WELCOME
8:45 am-9:20 am
Breakfast* DeVault Lobby

9:20 am-9:25 am
Welcome A201

PANEL PRESENTATIONS
9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 1a: Moving Through Language and Body A201
1. “Kinetic Image Schema – Performance Moving Through Metaphors in Windstorm”
Eric Heaps, Ph.D. Candidate in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “From choreo-singularity to choreo-anatomy: dancing the body-score of Becoming”
Laura Potrovic, Ph.D. Student in Theatre Studies, University of Paris 3- Sorbonne Nouvelle
3. “Space Animator: A ‘Bodymind’ Finds Flow with Suzuki Movement”
Justin Rincker, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Bridget Sundin, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 1b: Women, Politics, and Transformation Through Narrative A152
1. “Nationalist Mythology and Yeats’ Cyclical View of History”
Miriam Poole, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. ““I love dirty stories’: Lost, Happy Voices and Female Narrative Transformation”
Susannah Stengel, M.A. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
3. “The Pursuit of Identity by Women in The Force of Change and In the Blood”
Huihui Huang, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

11:00 am-12:00 pm
Panel 2: Practice as Research Roundtable: Antigone A 201
Panelists: Katie Horwitz, M.F.A. Student in Directing, Indiana University
Ashley Dillard, M.F.A. Student in Acting, Indiana University
Liz Shea, Associate Professor & Director of IU Contemporary Dance Program, Indiana University
Adam McLean, Assistant Professor of Movement & Stage Combat, Indiana University
Moderator: Bridget Sundin, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

12:00 pm-2:00 pm
Lunch

2:00 pm- 3:00pm
Performance/Roundtable 2: A201
“‘In Some Other Life’; Methods of Adaptation in Michael John LaChiusa’s Hello Again”
Joshua Robinson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Performers: Joey Birchler, Kayla Marie Eilers, Christian Fary, Mia Fitgibbon, Jimmy Hogan, Kaitlyn Mayse, Scott Van Wye, &
Michelle Zink; Amanda Li (Musical Direction), Kaitlyn Louise Smith (Choreography)
Moderator: Joe Stollenwerk

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 3a: Sheep, Sacrifice, Scotland, and Shootin’ A152
1. “Stage Violence as Religion, Ritual, Sacrifice”
Tom Oldham, Ph.D., Independent Scholar
2. “Performing Populism: A Play, a Pie, and a Pint”
Deana Nichols, Ph.D., Independent Scholar
3. “Annie Oakley, Folk Heroine and Actress”
Katherine A. Johnson, Ph.D. Student, Communication & Culture, Indiana University
4. “Disruptive Presences: Talking to Sheep in the Brome Abraham and Isaac”
Abby Ang, Ph.D. Student, English, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 3b: Verbal Art as Performance A201
1. “‘Wait. What did You Just Say?!’ Using Irving Goffman’s Expression Games To Analyze a Magic Performance”
Andres Lopez, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “Ethics and Ethnography: An Attempt in Understanding Dialect and Transcription”
Lora Smith, Ph.D. Student, Communication & Culture, Indiana University
3. “The Establishment and Maintenance of Short-Term Joking Relationships”
Sarah Campbell, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Dr. John H. McDowell, Professor of Folklore, Indiana University

4:15 pm-4:45 pm
Snack Break* DeVault Lobby

4:45-4:55 pm
Presentation of Essay Prize A201
Dr. Jennifer Goodlander

5:00-6:00 pm
Panel 4: Bodies in Performance A201
1. “A Concrete Utopia: The Call of Authenticity and Hope in Gay Verbatim Theatre”
Brennan Murphy, B.A. Student in Theatre, Indiana University
2. “The Actor’s Verse: An Analysis of The Second Shepherd’s Play”
Alexis DeSollar, B.F.A. Student in Acting, Millikin University
Panel Chair: Andrés López, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

6:00-7:30 pm
Catered Dinner * DeVault Lobby

Sunday, March 27th
8:30-9:15
Breakfast* DeVault Lobby

9:15 am-10:30 am
Panel 5: Race and Gender in Performance A201
1. “‘Help Us Stand Up Proudly Again’ – Lao She’s Love and Revolution”
Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “Ramleela in Kangra Valley of Himalaya”
Chitra Upadhyaya, Freelance Journalist, University of Pune, India
3. “The Re-Construction of Gender –– Masculinized Women’s Body in the Chinese Model Opera”
Weiyu Li, M.A. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Andrés López, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

10:45am- 11:45am
Keynote Address A201
“Sites of Possibilities: Converging Research and Creative Practice in Our Own Work”
Dr. Julia Listengarten, Professor of Theatre, University of Central Florida

11:45am-12:00pm
Closing Remarks A201

Call for Papers: 4th Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies Hosted by the Association for Research in Theatre at Indiana University

4th Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies
Hosted by the Association for Research in Theatre at Indiana University (ART@IU)

Replotting Performance

Jon McKenzie, in his 2001 book Perform or Else, makes the prediction that “performance will be to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries what discipline was to the eighteenth and nineteenth, that is an onto-historical formation of power and knowledge” (18). As McKenzie indicates, over the last part of the 20th century, there has been a growing emphasis on performance, which has permeated the social sciences and humanities. Disciplines as methodologically varied as anthropology and English, theatre and folklore, sociology and history all have related concerns
about the body, the place, the text, or even the object that performs– from the informal to the formal, from the everyday to the special event. Theorists from Victor Turner to Richard Schechner, from Erving Goffman to Richard Bauman and Charles Briggs, from Clifford Geertz to Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett all entertain, in some way, an orientation toward performance and in some respects, practice. If McKenzie’s prediction holds true, what space does this leave for theatre studies?

• Where do theatre artists find themselves situated amongst all of this theorizing on performance?
• How do current theatre practice trends confirm or trouble the idea of “performance”?
• What is theatre? What is performance? Is theatre just a subset of performance?
• How can performance studies in its varied forms and manifestations advance theatrical practice?
• How can rethinking performance inform the discipline of theatre?
• How can we translate this shift in perception into our work as theatre artists?
• What can perform? Just people? Things?
• What can be performed? Novels? Poems? Comic books?
• What benefits can we receive from rethinking performance in its broadest terms?
• What do we get when we expand our notions of what is and is not performance?
• What do we gain from looking broadly at related phenomenon under the umbrella of “performance?” What do we lose?

We call for individuals and groups to propose academic papers, experimental talks, live performance, roundtable discussions, informal presentations of research, staged readings, artistic manifestos,
workshops, and other media at the intersection of performance, theory, and practice. We encourage applicants to address the conference theme, but it is not required. We welcome and encourage a diversity of approaches, styles, and methods.

Please submit a 250-word abstract, if appropriate, or an artist statement and a brief bio to artatiu@gmail.com by January 1st, 2016. Participants will be notified of their acceptance by January 15th, 2016. The conference will be held on Indiana University’s Bloomington campus Friday, March 25th- Sunday, March 27th, 2016.

Photos from the 2014 Cultural Indigestion Conference

Everyone enjoyed the 2014 Art@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference. Papers, performances, and a roundtable were held to discuss the importance of intercultural theatre and performance practice. Here are a few pictures of the various events that made the conference successful!

 

Keynote Speaker Lucienne Guedes Fahrer Workshops and Lecture

The Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance, The Association for Research in Theater at IU, and Indiana University Student Association invite you to workshops and a lecture by:

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer  (University of São Paulo/Teatro da Vertigem)

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer

Workshop

“Working with Actors in Site-Specific Performance”

Tuesday, December 9, from 4:30 – 6:00 pm

Studio Theatre (Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center. 275 North Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN)

 

Lecture

“The Works of Lucienne Guedes Fahrer and the São Paulo Theatre Scene”

Wednesday, December 10, at 5:30 pm

A200 (Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center)

Workshop

“The Collaborative Playwriting Process”

Thursday, December 11, from 4:30 – 6:30 pm

Studio Theatre (Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center)

Another lecture, co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, will be offered in the Redbud Room of the Indiana Memorial Union, Wednesday, December 10, at 2:30 pm. This lecture will be in the Portuguese language and is entitled “O Processo Colaborativo de Criação.”

 

Cultural Indigestion Symposium Schedule

ART@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference

ART@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference

Indiana University Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance

Cultural Indigestion
3rd Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies

All events are in the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center, 275 N. Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405, with the exception of Panel 1 which is located at the Mathers Museum of World Cultures, 416 N. Indiana Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47408. There is free parking across the street from the theatre building, on the upper level of the Jordan Avenue Garage.

Friday, December 12
REGISTRATION AND OPENING EVENTS
3:30 pm-4:30 pm
Registration Table Open……………………………………………….Michaels Lobby

4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Panel 1: Mathers Museum Exhibit Opening – Still/Moving………..……Mathers Museum

6:00 pm-7:30 pm
Catered Dinner………..……………………………………………Lee Norvelle Center

8:00 pm-10:00 pm
Performance 1: Staged Reading of an Adaptation………………………….Studio Theatre
The Poisonwood Bible written and directed by Joe Stollenwerk

Saturday, December 13
BREAKFAST AND DEPARTMENTAL WELCOME
8:45 am-9:20 am
Bagel Breakfast………………….…………………………………….Michaels Lobby

9:20 am-9:25 am
Welcome.………………………………………………………………Studio Theatre
Dr. Ronald Wainscott
Director of Graduate Studies and Head of Theatre History, Theory, and Literature

PANEL PRESENTATIONS

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 2a: Re- and Un-Known Musicals…………………………………………Studio Theatre
1. Capitalism Induced Cannibalization and the Contemporary American Musical Revival of Chicago
Mike Rodriguez, Masters Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
2. When Hell Freezes Over, I’ll Skate: Vinnette Carroll’s Theatrical Melting Pot
Joe Stollenwerk, PhD Candidate in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
3. Singing Multiculturalism; Bilingualism and the 2009 Production of West Side Story
Joshua Robinson, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 2b: Transgressing Identity………………………….….………………….A 201
1. The Chinatown Cowboy: Re-masculating the Chinese Male Through the Drama of Frank Chin
Whit Emerson, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
2. Transgressive Dramaturgy in Prison-Based Theatre
Julie Rada, Raymond C. Morals Fellow, University of Utah
3. Challenging Gender in Anna and the Tropics
Andres Lopez, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
4. Chewing Up and Spitting Out a New White: Genet, Ward, Parks and the Absurd Terror of Whiteface
Susannah Stengel, Masters Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
11:00 am-12:35 pm
Panel 3: Practical Multiculturalism Roundtable…………………..………………A 201
Moderator: Sara Taylor, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
Panelists: Jennifer Goodlander, Assistant Professor of History,
Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Mauricio Miranda, MFA Student in Playwriting, Indiana University
Bridgette Dreher, MFA Student in Scenic Design, Indiana University
David Koté, MFA Student in Directing, Indiana University
Caroline Huerta, BFA Student in Musical Theatre, Indiana University

12:45 pm-1:45 pm
Performance 2: Performance of a Translation…………………………….Studio Theatre
I Didn’t Expect Such Humanity by Lucienne Guedes Fahrer
Translated and Directed by Eric “C” Heaps
(mature content – nudity)

1:45 pm-3:00 pm
BREAK FOR LUNCH

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 4a: Cultural Adaptation and Appropriation…………………………..Studio Theatre
1. War Bonnet: Racist and Sexualized Misappropriation of Native Dress
Emmie Pappa Eddy, Masters Student in Folklore, Indiana University
2. Rediscovering Shakespeare Through Translations
Brennan Murphy, Arts Management and Theatre & Drama Major, Indiana University
3. Thunder God: The Difficulties of Producing Chinese Theatre at an American University
Lucia Xioran Zhu, Theatre & Drama Major, Indiana University
3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 4b: Western Influences in Asia…………………………………….………A 201
1. Post-Colonial Indian Theatre
Jashodhara Sen, M.A. in Theatre Arts, Mumbai University
2. Brecht in China
Weiyu Li, Masters Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
3. Kim Jong-il on the Invention of Tradition and the Art of Propaganda
Sara Taylor, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

4:15 pm-4:30 pm
Snack Break………………………………………………………Theatre West Alcove

4:30-4:45 pm
Presentation of Essay Prize…………………………………………….Studio Theatre
Dr. Jennifer Goodlander
Assistant Professor of History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

4:45-6:00 pm
Keynote Address
Processo Colaborativo de Criação (Collaborative Process of Creation)……Studio Theatre
Lucienne Guedes Fahrer, Professor of Playwriting, Escola Superior de Artes Celia Helena

6:00-7:30 pm
Dinner Break

7:30-9:00 pm
IU Theatre…………………………..…………………………….Wells-Metz Theatre
In the Red and Brown Water by Tarell Alvin McCraney
Directed by David Koté
Talkback with David Koté and dramaturg Eric “C” Heaps to follow
Keynote Address

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer
lucienneguedes@terra.com.br
Escola Superior de Artes Celia Helena
Professor of Playwriting

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer is a playwright, actor, director, professor, and researcher. She received her first degree from the University of São Paulo (USP) in Theatre with a specialization in Theory of the Theatre (2000) and her Master’s in Theatre (2011), also from USP. As an invited artist for the Teatro de Narradores, Cia., she put on her production of CIDADE CORO – CIDADE FIM – CIDADE REVERSO, as both playwright and co-driector. This production represented Brazil in the Messe Frankfurt in Germany in 2013. She was also an invited actor for Cia. Balagan (under the direction of Maria Thaís Lima Santos) in the project Cabras in 2013. She was a founding actress of Teatro da Vertigem, with whom she has put on the productions O Paraíso Perdido (1992), Apocalipse 1,11 (2000), e A última palavra é a penúltima 2.0 (2014). In 1998 she was invited to be principal of the Free School of Theatre in Santo André. She was an invited professor of the Theatre Department of ECA-USP in 2009, 2010, and 2013 and an invited director for the School of Dramatic Arts at USP in 2014. She is professor of playwriting at the Escola Superior de Artes Celia Helena em São Paulo. She has a wide range of experience in the arts, with an emphasis in playwriting and acting/directing, workign principally in the following areas: the creation process, playwriting, theatrical interpretation, the collaborative process, body techniques, vocal techniques, and performance. Currently she is working on her doctorate at USP under the direction of Sílvia Fernandes (beginning in 2012), with her work focusing on the creative processes in playwriting.

“A restauração e os deslocamentos da narratividade no teatro”
“Restoration and Displacement in the Narrativity of Theatre”

Cultural Indigestion (colon) Exploring the Complexities of Interculturalism in Theatre and Performance

ART@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference

ART@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference

GRADUATE SYMPOSIUM @ INDIANA UNIVERSITY | CULTURAL INDIGESTION | DECEMBER 12-13, 2014

The 3rd Annual Indiana University Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance Graduate Symposium on Theatre & Performance Studies:

Cultural Indigestion (colon) Exploring the Complexities of Interculturalism in Theatre and Performance

“Tupi or not Tupi: that is the question.” -Oswald de Andrade

In 1928, Oswald de Andrade published his Cannibalist Manifesto, asserting Brazilians’ right to cannibalize other cultures and break free from post-colonial European dominance. In the next decade he would write the play The Candle King to try and put those ideas to work on stage. It was not performed until the Tropicalist movement found it and put it on in the 1960s. Such cultural tends to be linked with imperialism since those with the power are the ones appropriating the performance techniques and culture of others. This raises certain questions that do not sit easy on the stomach: Can cultural appropriation function in the way Andrade proposes? Is the metaphor of cannibalism or digestion appropriate for interculturalism? What are the stakes for the participants in intercultural performance?

In our increasingly global culture, the blurring of boundaries both forces cultures to mix and opens up more people to a desire to understand other cultures. In our third annual graduate symposium on theatre and performance studies, we hope to host a diverse, interdisciplinary community of scholars whose research ruminates on this mixed platter of performance and theory at the intersection of cultures. We seek proposals for papers, presentations, and performances that actively interrogate cultural cannibalism and intercultural performance.

Proposals might address topics relevant to the following areas:
• Cultural cannibalism
• Intercultural vs. Multicultural vs. Cross-cultural
• Borders and Margins
• Postcolonial performance
• Translation
• Diversity and difference
• Post-migrant theatre and immigration
• Syncretic theatre
• Adaptation and appropriation
• Bilingualism on the stage
• Diaspora studies

Conference dates: DECEMBER 12-13, 2014