Distinguished Acting Teacher Visits IU Theatre

Robert Benedetti

Dr. Robert Benedetti on Acting and the Current State of Theatre, Film, and Television

Robert Benedetti, PhD is a distinguished teacher of theatre who has had a forty-year career as a professor, director, and producer, and is the author of six books on stage and film. He was Dean of the School of Theatre at the California Institute of the Arts and Chairman of the Acting Department at the Yale Drama School, and won three Emmys and the Peabody Award for his films for HBO.

Thursday, April 10 | 5:30 pm
The Studio Theatre
2nd Flr., Lee Norvelle Theatre & Drama Center


ROBERT BENEDETTI received his PhD from Northwestern University. After serving as Artistic Director of the Court Theatre in Chicago, he was an early member of Chicago’s Second City Theatre, and then taught for fifty years at the University of Wisconsin, Carnegie-Mellon University, The National Theatre School of Canada, and the University of California, Riverside.

He was Chairman of Theatre at York University in Toronto, Chairman of the Acting Program at the Yale Drama School, and for eight years Dean of Theatre at The California Institute of the Arts. He was until 2011 a tenured Full Professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Artistic Director of the Nevada Conservatory Theatre.

Benedetti has directed at many regional theatres, including the Tyrone Guthrie Theatre, Australia’s Melbourne Theatre Company, the Milwaukee, South Coast, and San Diego Repertory Theatres, the Oregon, Colorado, and Great Lakes Shakespeare festivals, and many others.

He has also worked in the art museum field, recreating the 1913 Futurist Opera VICTORY OVER THE SUN by Kasimir Malevich for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and has also created shows on German Expressionism and Russian Agitprop. His productions have appeared at the Berlin Festival, the Demeervart in Amsterdam, the Hirschhorn Museum at the Smithsonian, and the Brooklyn Academy. His films are in the permanent collection of MoMA and many other museums and university art departments.

He served as an advisor to the U. S. Department of Education and as a Fulbright Panelist. As President of Ted Danson’s Anasazi Productions at Paramount Studios, and later as an independent screenwriter/producer, he won three Best Picture Emmys, two Humanitas Prizes, and a Peabody Award for producing Miss Evers’ Boys and A Lesson Before Dying for HBO, and six other films. He most recently completed a screenplay for HBO on the 1885 Chicago Haymarket bombing.

Benedetti has also written six books on acting and film production, including The Actor At Work (10th edition), The Actor in You (5th edition), ACTION! Acting for Film and Television, and From Concept to Screen, an Overview of Film and TV Production.

In 2005 he received the Lifetime Career Achievement Award from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE). In 2012 he was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Theatre at the Kennedy Center.

This Friday 4/11 and next Friday 4/18  Robert Benedetti will ALSO be first in AD 060 from 1:00 to 3:00 and then in The Studio Theatre from 3:00 to 4:00.

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(corpo)realities | March 23-24 | Conference Weekend Itinerary

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All events are in the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center, 275 N. Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405. There is free parking across the street from the theatre building, on the upper level of the Jordan Avenue Garage.

Friday, March 22

Seminar

3:00 pm-4:45 pm

Rhizome: Choreography of a Moving Writing Self…………………………………………..Studio Theatre
Dr. Petra Kuppers, Professor of English, Theatre and Dance, & Women’s Studies, University of Michigan

Registration, Dinner, and a Show

5:00-6:00 pm

Registration Table Open……………………………………………………………………..Michaels Lobby

6:00-7:15 pm

Welcome Reception and Catered Dinner………..………………………………….Mezzanine Gallery

7:30-9:00 pm

IU Theatre’s At First Sight, A Repertory of New Plays……………Wells-Metz Theatre

(a love story) by Kelly P. Lusk, directed by Paul Daily
Kelly Lusk, MFA Playwriting Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

Saturday, March 23

Breakfast and Departmental Welcome

8:00-8:30 am

Bagel Breakfast…………………………………………………………………………………Michaels Lobby

8:30-8:35 am

Welcome.…..……………..……………..……………..……..……………..………………Wells-Metz Theatre
Professor Ronald Wainscott, Director of Graduate Studies, Head of Theatre History, Theory, & Literature

8:35-9:20 am

How to Tell (a love story) ………………………………………………………………Wells-Metz Theatre
Assistant Professor Ken Weitzman, Head of IU’s MFA Playwriting Program, interviews Kelly P. Lusk

Panel Presentations

9:30 am-10:45 am

Panel 1a: Dramaturgies of Difference………………………………………………Studio Theatre

1. Elephants on the Moors: The Abberant Patient’s Construction and Resistance in Joan Schenkar’s Signs of Life
Kim Hinton, PhD Candidate and Undergraduate Advisor in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

2. Sterno und Drang: The Connection Between Agency and Outlaw in Machinal, The Verge, and Out of Sterno
Julia Moriarty, PhD Student in Theatre, Wayne State University

3.  Reclaiming Wholeness: The Dramaturgy of Disability in D.W. Gregory’s Dirty Pictures
Bradley Stephenson, PhD Student in Theatre, University of Missouri

9:30 am-10:45 am

Panel 1b: Building Character with Cognitive Science…….…………………………A 201

4.  Their Bodies Are Also Mine: Extended Cognition Meets Becoming in a Physical Theatre Rehearsal Room
Slade Billew, PhD Student in Theatre & Film, Bowling Green State University
Angenette Spalink, PhD Student in Theatre & Film, Bowling Green State University (via Skype)

5.  Speaking Bodies: An Actor’s Awareness of Character
Tyler Eglen, MFA in Theatre Performance, Arizona State University

6.  From the Body Into the World: Viewpoints’ Use of the Actor’s Memory
Dr. Devin Malcolm, Adjunct Professor of Theatre, Slippery Rock University

11:00 am-12:15 pm

Panel 2a: The Effect of Affect on Othered Bodies…………………….………Studio Theatre

7.  Crip Identifications: The Affective Possibilities of Disability and Dance
Sami Schalk, PhD Candidate in Gender Studies, Indiana University

8.  Bodies in Motion: Photographic Sequences of Transsexual Bodies as Performance
Joshua Trey Barnett, MA Student in Communication and Culture, Indiana University

9.  Towards a Phenomenological Approach to the Black Performer’s Body in Brazilian Black Theatrical Practice
Gustavo Melo Cerqueira, MA Student in African & African Diaspora Studies, University of Texas – Austin

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Seminar: “Rhizome: Choreography of a Moving Writing Self” with Dr. Petra Kuppers

The Association for Research in Theatre at Indiana University (ART@IU) and The Department of Theatre & Drama cordially invite faculty and graduate students to participate in:

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“Rhizome: Choreography of a Moving Writing Self”

A seminar on disability culture and community performance conducted by artist, scholar, and dancer Petra Kuppers

Friday, March 22, 2013 | 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Studio Theatre, Theatre Building, 2nd Floor

SPACE IS LIMITED; please RSVP to taylosar@indiana.edu to attend. Two readings from Petra’s most recent book Disability Culture and Community Performance: Find a Strange and Twisted Shape (Palgrave 2011) will be made available to participants in advance of the seminar.

PETRA KUPPERS is Professor of English, Theatre and Dance, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. A performance maker, community artist, and self-proclaimed witnessing critic, theorist, and a disability culture activist, Kuppers cites her journey as an artist as emerging from a “passionate exploration of performance ethics and community building.”

“What we call ‘art’ is up for grabs, needs to be re-thought, re-created, every time we step into the river of practice,” she writes.

“I know this because as a disabled dancer living with pain and fatigue, I have to subvert the ordinary, have fun in unusual spaces, and find time out of time.” For over twenty years, Kuppers has engaged community participants gently and with thought-in-process work. Some of these workshops happened in women’s centers, hospices, mental health self-help groups, youth groups, traditional Weavers and Knitters Guilds, with politicians, with people labeled as ‘developmentally disabled’, with cancer survivors, in National Parks, in abandoned buildings, and on the beach.

In addition to teaching, Kuppers is also Artistic Director of The Olimpias, a performance research project that investigates intersections between community art, identity politics, and (new) media. Some of her past works include Disability and Contemporary Performance: Bodies on Edge (Routledge, 2003), The Scar of Visibility: Medical Performances and Contemporary Art (University of Minnesota Press, 2007), and Community Performance: An Introduction (Routledge, 2007). Her most recent book, Disability Culture and Community Performance: Find a Strange and Twisted Shape (Palgrave 2011) won the American Society for Theatre Research’s 2011 Sally Banes Prize.

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This event is a part of (corpo)realities, the second annual Indiana University Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies, a two-day event where young scholars from all over Europe and the Americas will convene in Bloomington to present their research in progress. This year’s conference will feature academic paper presentations, demonstrations, actor-training workshops, and short performance pieces that actively question the role of embodiment and presence in art.

The conference is hosted by the Department of Theatre & Drama in affiliation with the Association for Research in Theatre at IndianaUniversity, (ART@IU), a newly minted organization formed to foster a scholarly community for graduate and advanced undergraduate students to share their work in theatre and performance studies. With plans to host future conferences, guest speakers, and practice-as-research performances, ART@IU hopes to provide opportunities for Indiana University students to expand their professional networks by developing connections with other theatre researchers within the college and beyond.

(corpo)realities will convene at the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center with an evening performance of (a love story) on Friday, March 22.  The student presentations will commence in the morning on Saturday, March 23 and continue through the keynote speech in the late afternoon. All events are open to the public, though seating is limited.  More information about the conference and tickets for (a love story) may be  found online at theatre.indiana.edu.

Jan 31: Inaugural Timothy Wiles Memorial Lecturer is Beth Holmgren

The Polish Studies Center in cooperation with the Departments of Theatre & Drama, English, Comparative Literature, and Slavic Languages & Literature presents The Inaugural Timothy Wiles Memorial Lecture:

“Shows of Solidarity: Cabaret in Interwar Warsaw”

January 31 2013, 7:00 pm
Indiana Memorial Union, Georgian Room

For more information, check out the Polish Studies Center’s homepage.

Dr. Beth Holmgren, Duke University


BETH HOLMGREN is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies and Theater Studies at Duke University. She received her Ph.D. in Slavic Literatures from Harvard University and is author of, among other books, Women’s Works in Stalin’s Time, editor (with Helena Goscilo) of Poles Apart: Women in Modern Polish Culture, and translator and editor (with Helena Goscilo) of The Keys to Happiness by Anastasya Verbitskaya. Her most recent book, Starring Madame Modjeska: On Tour in Poland and America (2011, Indiana University Press) details the life of Poland’s leading nineteenth-century actress, Helena Modrzejewska, who emigrated to southern California in 1876 to establish a utopian commune, but ended up as a leading Shakespearean actress on the American stage, playing opposite such celebrated actors as Edwin Booth and Maurice Barrymore. The book traces Modjeska’s fabulous life and career from her illegitimate birth in Krakow, to her successive reinventions of herself as a star in both Poland and America, and finally to her enduring legacy.