Replotting Performance Conference Schedule

Conference Schedule

All events take place at the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center, located at
275 N Jordan Avenue on Indiana University’s Bloomington Campus.

Friday, March 25th
REGISTRATION AND OPENING EVENTS
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
Registration Table Open Theatre Art Gallery

6:30 pm-7:15 pm
Pre-Show Talk and hors d’oeuvres* Theatre Art Gallery
Featuring: Peter Gil-Sheridan, Mauricio Miranda, and Bruce Walsh

7:30 pm-10:00 pm
Performance 1: Wells-Metz Theatre
Occupants by Mauricio Miranda

Saturday, March 26th
BREAKFAST AND DEPARTMENTAL WELCOME
8:45 am-9:20 am
Breakfast* DeVault Lobby

9:20 am-9:25 am
Welcome A201

PANEL PRESENTATIONS
9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 1a: Moving Through Language and Body A201
1. “Kinetic Image Schema – Performance Moving Through Metaphors in Windstorm”
Eric Heaps, Ph.D. Candidate in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “From choreo-singularity to choreo-anatomy: dancing the body-score of Becoming”
Laura Potrovic, Ph.D. Student in Theatre Studies, University of Paris 3- Sorbonne Nouvelle
3. “Space Animator: A ‘Bodymind’ Finds Flow with Suzuki Movement”
Justin Rincker, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Bridget Sundin, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 1b: Women, Politics, and Transformation Through Narrative A152
1. “Nationalist Mythology and Yeats’ Cyclical View of History”
Miriam Poole, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. ““I love dirty stories’: Lost, Happy Voices and Female Narrative Transformation”
Susannah Stengel, M.A. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
3. “The Pursuit of Identity by Women in The Force of Change and In the Blood”
Huihui Huang, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

11:00 am-12:00 pm
Panel 2: Practice as Research Roundtable: Antigone A 201
Panelists: Katie Horwitz, M.F.A. Student in Directing, Indiana University
Ashley Dillard, M.F.A. Student in Acting, Indiana University
Liz Shea, Associate Professor & Director of IU Contemporary Dance Program, Indiana University
Adam McLean, Assistant Professor of Movement & Stage Combat, Indiana University
Moderator: Bridget Sundin, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

12:00 pm-2:00 pm
Lunch

2:00 pm- 3:00pm
Performance/Roundtable 2: A201
“‘In Some Other Life’; Methods of Adaptation in Michael John LaChiusa’s Hello Again”
Joshua Robinson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Performers: Joey Birchler, Kayla Marie Eilers, Christian Fary, Mia Fitgibbon, Jimmy Hogan, Kaitlyn Mayse, Scott Van Wye, &
Michelle Zink; Amanda Li (Musical Direction), Kaitlyn Louise Smith (Choreography)
Moderator: Joe Stollenwerk

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 3a: Sheep, Sacrifice, Scotland, and Shootin’ A152
1. “Stage Violence as Religion, Ritual, Sacrifice”
Tom Oldham, Ph.D., Independent Scholar
2. “Performing Populism: A Play, a Pie, and a Pint”
Deana Nichols, Ph.D., Independent Scholar
3. “Annie Oakley, Folk Heroine and Actress”
Katherine A. Johnson, Ph.D. Student, Communication & Culture, Indiana University
4. “Disruptive Presences: Talking to Sheep in the Brome Abraham and Isaac”
Abby Ang, Ph.D. Student, English, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 3b: Verbal Art as Performance A201
1. “‘Wait. What did You Just Say?!’ Using Irving Goffman’s Expression Games To Analyze a Magic Performance”
Andres Lopez, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “Ethics and Ethnography: An Attempt in Understanding Dialect and Transcription”
Lora Smith, Ph.D. Student, Communication & Culture, Indiana University
3. “The Establishment and Maintenance of Short-Term Joking Relationships”
Sarah Campbell, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Dr. John H. McDowell, Professor of Folklore, Indiana University

4:15 pm-4:45 pm
Snack Break* DeVault Lobby

4:45-4:55 pm
Presentation of Essay Prize A201
Dr. Jennifer Goodlander

5:00-6:00 pm
Panel 4: Bodies in Performance A201
1. “A Concrete Utopia: The Call of Authenticity and Hope in Gay Verbatim Theatre”
Brennan Murphy, B.A. Student in Theatre, Indiana University
2. “The Actor’s Verse: An Analysis of The Second Shepherd’s Play”
Alexis DeSollar, B.F.A. Student in Acting, Millikin University
Panel Chair: Andrés López, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

6:00-7:30 pm
Catered Dinner * DeVault Lobby

Sunday, March 27th
8:30-9:15
Breakfast* DeVault Lobby

9:15 am-10:30 am
Panel 5: Race and Gender in Performance A201
1. “‘Help Us Stand Up Proudly Again’ – Lao She’s Love and Revolution”
Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “Ramleela in Kangra Valley of Himalaya”
Chitra Upadhyaya, Freelance Journalist, University of Pune, India
3. “The Re-Construction of Gender –– Masculinized Women’s Body in the Chinese Model Opera”
Weiyu Li, M.A. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Andrés López, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

10:45am- 11:45am
Keynote Address A201
“Sites of Possibilities: Converging Research and Creative Practice in Our Own Work”
Dr. Julia Listengarten, Professor of Theatre, University of Central Florida

11:45am-12:00pm
Closing Remarks A201

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Feb. 21: Mathers Museum presents Jennifer Goodlander on Indonesian Puppetry as “Intangible Cultural Heritage”

Wayang-Kulit-PuppetUnderstanding Puppets as Heritage: Performing Objects/Performing Culture

Friday, February 21 | 12:30 – 1:30 pm
Mathers Museum of World Culture
416 N. Indiana Ave, Bloomington, IN 47408

Join MMWC Faculty Research Curator and Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance professor Dr. Jennifer Goodlander as she discussses puppetry as heritage. UNESCO has designated puppetry as “Intangible Cultural Heritage” in several Asian nations, adding to its economic and political relevance. This designation, however, also problematizes the relationship between the tangible objects with the intangible performance. In the museum the objects of performance function as a transatlantic archive of living and changing traditions; likewise the tradition of Asian performance lies within the body and that in order to understand the tradition and how it changes one must engage with the art as performer. In this presentation, Goodlander will explore how the puppet as an object in a museum articulates (past) performances and performs cultural heritage.

The lecture will be free and open to the public.

Jennifer Goodlancer, Theatre, Drama, & Contemporary Dance

Dr. Jennifer Goodlander, Dept.  of  Theatre, Drama, & Contemporary Dance


JENNIFER GOODLANDER is Assistant Professor of Theatre History, Theory, and Literature in IU’s Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance. Her research focuses on Asian performance as it intersects with gender studies, ethnography, performance studies, postcolonial theory, visual culture studies, and transnational circuits of performance.  Her dissertation, with research funded by a Fulbright Fellowship to Indonesia, focused on women and performance in Bali, especially wayang kulit or shadow puppetry.  She is currently revising the dissertation into a book manuscript tentatively called Women in the Shadows: Gender, Puppets, and the Power of Tradition in Bali.  Drawing upon her own experience of the practical training and ritual initiation to become a dalang, or puppeteer, coupled with interviews of early women dalangs and leading artists, she argues that “tradition” in Bali must be understood as a system of power that is inextricably linked to gender hierarchy.

Jennifer is interested in unraveling and exploring connections between scholarship and theatrical practice.  In New York City and regionally she worked extensively as a director and teacher with a special emphasis on new plays and physically based performance.   She combined Asian theatre into innovative productions of The Ghost Sonata, The Bacchae, and others.  She was a member of the 2005 Lincoln Center Director’s Lab that focused on new play development and working in collaboration.  She often shares her research through performances and lectures at theatres, civic groups, and universities and has performed wayang kulit in NYC, Michigan, Kentucky, Illinois, and Ohio.  Jennifer is the Membership and Outreach Coordinator for the Association for Asian Performance (AAP) and Symposium Co-Chair for Practice and Production Symposium of the Mid-America Theatre Conference (MATC).

Jennifer Goodlander’s Grad Class T583, Theatre East/West Invites Composer P.Q. Phan to Discuss Intercultural Opera

Jennifer Goodlander's T583 Invites P.Q. Phan to Discuss Intercultural Performance

In the 20th century, as world-travel has become more accessible, theatre has experienced an explosion of cross-influences.  Artists have shared stories, techniques, and especially aesthetics.  This phenomenon of artistic development and sharing is not new – but recently it carries baggage of colonialism, tourism, and differences in economic and political power between “first” and “third” world nations. “Tradition” or “traditional performance” carries a certain value within local and global contexts.

Dr. Jennifer Goodlander’s class, THTR T583: Theatre East/West, examines both Western and Nonwestern performance, and how these performances, and categories of performance, have shaped the practice and teaching of theatre in the 21st century.  The categories of Asian performance, intercultural theatre, and tradition each embody a considerable scope of work—it is not the intention of this class to give a comprehensive or complete overview of any of these topics. Rather this class seeks to introduce the student to a variety of performance genres, practices, and debates so that each student will have the tools to do further research and practice. Goals include attempts to:

  • Develop an understanding and appreciation of traditional theatre genres in Asia.  Our study will focus on aesthetics and story but we will also explore the role that performance plays in Asian cultures.
  • Workshop some of the physical and vocal styles used in traditional Asian theatre.
  • Examine a variety of theatre artists that are forging companies/productions/systems of training with international aesthetics.
  • Understand some of the theoretical models for discussing intercultural theatre practices.
  • Investigate the notion of “tradition” and how it relates to performance in contemporary global societies.
  • Participate in the debate concerning ethics surrounding intercultural performance.
  • Apply our understanding of methods, aesthetics, and theory in papers and creative projects exploring possibilities that emerge when you combine performance traditions from the East and West.

Dr. Jennifer Goodlander Receives Mellon Innovating International Research & Teaching Grant

Dr. Jennifer Goodlander performs Indonesian shadow pupper theatre, wayang kulit, at her Alma mater, Ohio University, in September 2011.

Congratulations to Dr. Jennifer Goodlander, Assistant Professor of Theatre History, Theory, and Literature and recent fellowship recipient in the first round of funding to IU Bloomington faculty from the Mellon Innovating International Research and Teaching Grant Program, funded by $750,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Jennifer plans to use her faculty felllowship to conduct field research in Indonesia and Cambodia in Summer 2013, studying how the arts, especially shadow puppetry, functions in the formation of Southeast Asian national identity.

“An IUB Professor Creates—and Performs with—Balinese Shadow Puppets” | Inside IU features Dr. Jennifer Goodlander

Dr. Jennifer Goodlander performs wayang kulit, a form of traditional Balinese shadow puppetry. Goodlander trained in the ancient art while studying for her doctoral degree on a Fulbright Fellowship in Indonesia.

Dr. Jennifer Goodlander, the newest Assistant Professor of History, Theory, and Literature in the Department of Theatre & Drama is this month’s Featured Spotlight in Inside IU, the online news magazine for faculty and staff at Indiana University Bloomington. According to Bethany Nolan’s intimate profile:

“If you’re lucky, [Jennifer Goodlander] will show you one of the brightly colored and intricately carved puppets she’s mastered use of through her studies of an ancient Balinese art form — wayang kulit, or shadow puppetry. … But watch her give an actual performance, and you’ll only see the puppets through a thin cloth screen. That’s because the show — and all the magnificence of those works of art — is meant for the gods. As part of the human audience, your eyes are allowed to see a mere shadow of the story.”

Goodlander became interested in traditional Balinese shadow puppetry while studying for her doctoral degree on a Fulbright Fellowship in Indonesia. Her research there focused on broadly women and performance, but after trying her hand at the ancient art form, her dissertation project shifted to include her own experience learning wayang kulit. Drawing upon her own experience of the practical training and ritual initiation to become a dalang, or puppeteer, coupled with interviews of early women dalangs and leading artists, she argues in her book manuscript (tentatively titled Women in the Shadows: Gender, Puppets, and the Power of Tradition in Bali) that “tradition” in Bali must be understood as a system of power that is inextricably linked to gender hierarchy.

Read more about Jennifer in the Inside IU Spotlight Profile, or on her faculty profile at theatre.indiana.edu.