Apr 21: MA/Phd Paper Presentations

IU’s Department of Theatre, Drama, & Contemporary Dance invite you to a presentation of graduate scholarship.

Selected MA/PhD students will share their work from the past year, followed by a response from theatre faculty.

Monday, April 21 // 4:30 pm
Wells-Metz Theatre
275 N. Jordan Ave. (Off the First Floor Theatre Lobby)
Reception to follow.

 Paper Presentations:

“‘Now I am loathest, alas, that ere was lost’: Satan’s Transformation(s) in the York Cycle”

Miriam Poole, PhD Student

 “Phenomenal Flatulence: A Consideration of Bodily Functions in The Imaginary Invalid”

Sarah Campbell, PhD Student

“Slaves in Algiers, or a Struggle for an American National Identity”

Michael Rodriguez, MA Student

“‘Well, I’ll be hanged for a halfpenny, if there be not some abomination knavery in this play’: Humor as Ugliness & Ugliness as Humor in Beaumont and Fletcher’s Knight of the Burning Pestle

Justin Rincker, PhD Student

Student Presenters:

Sarah Campbell
Sarah Campbell received her B.A. in Theatre from the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky and her M.A. in Theatre with an emphasis in Directing from the University of Nebraska Omaha. Her research interests include the phenomenological study of performance, the contemporary re-staging of Restoration texts, and Maya ritual performance in the Classic period. She is currently Vice President and conference co-chair for IU’s Association for Research in Theatre (ART@IU). Sarah is from Louisville, Kentucky.

Miriam Poole
Miriam received her B.A. in Theatre and German from Hillsdale College in Hillsdale, Michigan and her M.A. in Theatre HIstory, Theory, and Literature from Indiana University. Her research interests include medieval theatre, German romanticism, and the theatrical activities of the Irish Literary Revival. Miriam is from West Chicago, Illinois.

Justin Rincker
Justin received both his B.A. in Anthropology and English Literature and his M.A. in Drama from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. His research interests include the combined work of Tadashi Suzuki and Anne Bogart and the history of movement on the stage, especially in comic performance. Justin’s directing and performance credits include productions with Metro Theatre Company, New Jewish Theatre, OnSite Theatre Company, Dramatic License Productions, and HotCity Theatre, all in St. Louis.

Michael Rodriguez Mike received his B.A. in Cinema and Drama from San Francisco State University in San Francisco, California. Before coming to IU, he worked as an actor, a tour guide in Paris, and an ESL teacher. His current research project includes a critical look at American stage productions depicting slavery during the late eighteenth century. Mike also works for the Telluride Film Festival as the Alumni Coordinator of the Student Symposium.

Sept. 26: Theatre Circle presents Dr. Alison Calhoun on Molière’s Imaginary Invalid

Courtesy of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France

“‘This Fatal Marriage’: The Critique of Opera in Molière’s Imaginary Invalid”

Molière’s Imaginary Invalid draws a very fine line between fact and fiction, since it not only presents illness and dying as its subject matter, it has gone down in the history of theater as the play during which its dramatist, playing the title role, met his own death. But Molière’s final performance was not just brought about because of bad health. His fame and the future of his comedies were also severely threatened by his once collaborator, turned rival, the opera composer Lully. This talk will look at how the more obvious subject matter of quack doctors and ridiculous medicine doubled as a clever strike at Lully and the rise of opera.

Dr. Alison Calhoun, Department of French & Italian

Dr. Alison Calhoun, Department of French & Italian

Alison Calhoun is Assistant Professor of French in IU’s Department of French and Italian. Her research focuses on the cultural and intellectual history of the Renaissance and extends to the 17th and 18th centuries to study genre, reception (theater), and morality. Her approach is interdisciplinary (philosophy and literature, music and literature) and often fits into the categories of history of the book, reception theory, and genre studies. Her forthcoming book, A Transverse Self: Montaigne and the Lives of the Philosophers, situates Montaigne and Diogenes Laertius in the history of life writing in the Renaissance and Classical Age in France.

In Calhoun’s latest research project, Motion and Emotion in Early Modern French Drama, she explores the reading, staging and stagecraft of composite drama (court ballet, machine plays, comedy-ballets, and opera). With key authors like Balthasar de Beaujoyeulx, Honorat de Bueil de Racan, Honoré D’Urfé, Jean Mairet, Pierre Corneille, Isaac de Benserade and Philippe Quinault, she aims to show that the libretto, parallel to and concurrently with the novel, trained readers not only to imagine greater fictional possibilities than before, but also to feel (sometimes to practice) more diverse emotions.