Replotting Performance Conference Schedule

Conference Schedule

All events take place at the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center, located at
275 N Jordan Avenue on Indiana University’s Bloomington Campus.

Friday, March 25th
REGISTRATION AND OPENING EVENTS
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
Registration Table Open Theatre Art Gallery

6:30 pm-7:15 pm
Pre-Show Talk and hors d’oeuvres* Theatre Art Gallery
Featuring: Peter Gil-Sheridan, Mauricio Miranda, and Bruce Walsh

7:30 pm-10:00 pm
Performance 1: Wells-Metz Theatre
Occupants by Mauricio Miranda

Saturday, March 26th
BREAKFAST AND DEPARTMENTAL WELCOME
8:45 am-9:20 am
Breakfast* DeVault Lobby

9:20 am-9:25 am
Welcome A201

PANEL PRESENTATIONS
9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 1a: Moving Through Language and Body A201
1. “Kinetic Image Schema – Performance Moving Through Metaphors in Windstorm”
Eric Heaps, Ph.D. Candidate in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “From choreo-singularity to choreo-anatomy: dancing the body-score of Becoming”
Laura Potrovic, Ph.D. Student in Theatre Studies, University of Paris 3- Sorbonne Nouvelle
3. “Space Animator: A ‘Bodymind’ Finds Flow with Suzuki Movement”
Justin Rincker, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Bridget Sundin, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 1b: Women, Politics, and Transformation Through Narrative A152
1. “Nationalist Mythology and Yeats’ Cyclical View of History”
Miriam Poole, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. ““I love dirty stories’: Lost, Happy Voices and Female Narrative Transformation”
Susannah Stengel, M.A. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
3. “The Pursuit of Identity by Women in The Force of Change and In the Blood”
Huihui Huang, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

11:00 am-12:00 pm
Panel 2: Practice as Research Roundtable: Antigone A 201
Panelists: Katie Horwitz, M.F.A. Student in Directing, Indiana University
Ashley Dillard, M.F.A. Student in Acting, Indiana University
Liz Shea, Associate Professor & Director of IU Contemporary Dance Program, Indiana University
Adam McLean, Assistant Professor of Movement & Stage Combat, Indiana University
Moderator: Bridget Sundin, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

12:00 pm-2:00 pm
Lunch

2:00 pm- 3:00pm
Performance/Roundtable 2: A201
“‘In Some Other Life’; Methods of Adaptation in Michael John LaChiusa’s Hello Again”
Joshua Robinson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Performers: Joey Birchler, Kayla Marie Eilers, Christian Fary, Mia Fitgibbon, Jimmy Hogan, Kaitlyn Mayse, Scott Van Wye, &
Michelle Zink; Amanda Li (Musical Direction), Kaitlyn Louise Smith (Choreography)
Moderator: Joe Stollenwerk

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 3a: Sheep, Sacrifice, Scotland, and Shootin’ A152
1. “Stage Violence as Religion, Ritual, Sacrifice”
Tom Oldham, Ph.D., Independent Scholar
2. “Performing Populism: A Play, a Pie, and a Pint”
Deana Nichols, Ph.D., Independent Scholar
3. “Annie Oakley, Folk Heroine and Actress”
Katherine A. Johnson, Ph.D. Student, Communication & Culture, Indiana University
4. “Disruptive Presences: Talking to Sheep in the Brome Abraham and Isaac”
Abby Ang, Ph.D. Student, English, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 3b: Verbal Art as Performance A201
1. “‘Wait. What did You Just Say?!’ Using Irving Goffman’s Expression Games To Analyze a Magic Performance”
Andres Lopez, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “Ethics and Ethnography: An Attempt in Understanding Dialect and Transcription”
Lora Smith, Ph.D. Student, Communication & Culture, Indiana University
3. “The Establishment and Maintenance of Short-Term Joking Relationships”
Sarah Campbell, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Dr. John H. McDowell, Professor of Folklore, Indiana University

4:15 pm-4:45 pm
Snack Break* DeVault Lobby

4:45-4:55 pm
Presentation of Essay Prize A201
Dr. Jennifer Goodlander

5:00-6:00 pm
Panel 4: Bodies in Performance A201
1. “A Concrete Utopia: The Call of Authenticity and Hope in Gay Verbatim Theatre”
Brennan Murphy, B.A. Student in Theatre, Indiana University
2. “The Actor’s Verse: An Analysis of The Second Shepherd’s Play”
Alexis DeSollar, B.F.A. Student in Acting, Millikin University
Panel Chair: Andrés López, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

6:00-7:30 pm
Catered Dinner * DeVault Lobby

Sunday, March 27th
8:30-9:15
Breakfast* DeVault Lobby

9:15 am-10:30 am
Panel 5: Race and Gender in Performance A201
1. “‘Help Us Stand Up Proudly Again’ – Lao She’s Love and Revolution”
Whit Emerson, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
2. “Ramleela in Kangra Valley of Himalaya”
Chitra Upadhyaya, Freelance Journalist, University of Pune, India
3. “The Re-Construction of Gender –– Masculinized Women’s Body in the Chinese Model Opera”
Weiyu Li, M.A. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Panel Chair: Andrés López, Ph.D. Student in Theatre History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

10:45am- 11:45am
Keynote Address A201
“Sites of Possibilities: Converging Research and Creative Practice in Our Own Work”
Dr. Julia Listengarten, Professor of Theatre, University of Central Florida

11:45am-12:00pm
Closing Remarks A201

Photos from the 2014 Cultural Indigestion Conference

Everyone enjoyed the 2014 Art@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference. Papers, performances, and a roundtable were held to discuss the importance of intercultural theatre and performance practice. Here are a few pictures of the various events that made the conference successful!

 

Apr 11: Bruce McConachie Conducts 2014 Wertheim Seminar in Performance

The Wertheim Seminar in Performance and the IU Department of English invite interested graduate students to participate in a seminar conducted by Professor Bruce McConachie, Professor of Theatre Arts, University of Pittsburgh

Human_Brain-with-bodies1

New Directions in Performance Studies

Friday, April 11 | 10:30-12:00
Dogwood Room, IMU

Meaning of the BodyThis seminar will discuss intersections of theatre, performance, and embodied cognition. Students should expect to read Mark Johnson’s The Meaning of the Body in preparation for the seminar.

SPACE IS LIMITED; please RSVP to amyecook@indiana.edu to attend.

Bruce McConachie

Dr. Bruce McConachie, University of Pittsburgh


BRUCE MCCONACHIE is a specialist in American theatre history, theatre historiography, and the intersection of cognitive science and theatre. His major books include, MelodramaticFormationsAmerican Theater in the Culture of the Cold WarInterpreting the Theatrical Past (with Tom Postlewait), Theatre & Mind, and Engaging Audiences: A Cognitive Approach to Spectating in the Theatre. He is the co-editor (with F. Elizabeth Hart) of Performance and Cognition: Theatre Studies and the Cognitive Turn and the co-editor (with Blakey Vermeule) of the Palgrave series on Cognitive Studies in Literature and Performance. He has been the President of the American Society for Theatre Research and a winner of its Distinguished Scholar Award. He is currently the Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Theatre Arts.

Mar 4: Mathers Museum Presents Dr. John Laudun on the Material Culture of Mardi Gras

kreweThe Matter of Mardi Gras: How People Use the Tangible Things of this World to Create the Intangible

Tuesday, March 4 || 12:00 – 1:00 pm
Mathers Museum of World Culture
416 N. Indiana Ave, Bloomington, IN 47408

The Mermentau Mardi Gras, the Krewe de Foux (crew of fools), as they call themselves, traverse the small corner of the south Louisiana landscape known as Mermentau Cove. This presentation by John Laudun, an Associate Professor of English at the University of Louisiana, seeks to sketch a simple matrix of objects and ideas, in an attempt to understand not only how people manifest themselves in the world but also how they make their world manifest using both the ordinary and extraordinary means available to them during the particular festival moment that is Mardi Gras in the Louisiana prairies.

Dr. John Laudun, University of Louisiana

Dr. John Laudun, University of Louisiana


JOHN LAUDUN is Associate Professor of English at the University of Louisiana where he teaches courses in folklore, creativity studies, and documentary studies. He received his MA in literary studies from Syracuse University in 1989 and his PhD in folklore studies from the Folklore Institute at Indiana University in 1999. He was a Jacob K. Javits Fellow and a MacArthur Scholar at the Indiana Center for Global Change and World Peace (1993-94). His forthcoming monograph, The Makers of Things: How a Bunch of Cajun and German Farmers and Fabricators Invented a Traditional Amphibious Boat (University Press of Mississippi 2014), is the first book-length study of Louisiana material culture wherein Laudun investigates how the residents of the southern part of the state actually imagine the landscape on which they live and work.

Apr 10: Bruce McConachie to Deliver 2014 Albert Wertheim Lecture

The Indiana University Department of English announces the 4th Annual Albert Wertheim Lecture in Performance:

McConachie LectureTHE WERTHEIM SEMINAR IN PERFORMANCE fosters advanced work in theater, drama, and performance studies in the English Department and at IU. It honors the legacy and influence of Albert J. Wertheim, a leading scholar and supporter of the dramatic arts at Indiana University and elsewhere. Professor Wertheim received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1965 and taught at Princeton University before moving to Indiana in 1969, where he taught until the time of his death in 2003. The subjects of his published articles span the canon of Western drama and theatre: from Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, and James Shirley to Bertolt Brecht, Arthur Miller, Eugene O’Neill, William Inge, and many others.  He is the author of two books: The Dramatic Art of Athol Fugard: From South Africa to the World (2000) and Staging the War: American Drama and World War II (published posthumously, 2004).

Click here to find further information about Theatre/Performance Studies in the IU English Department.

Bruce McConachie

Dr. Bruce McConachie, University of Pittsburgh


BRUCE MCCONACHIE is a specialist in American theatre history, theatre historiography, and the intersection of cognitive science and theatre. His major books include, MelodramaticFormations, American Theater in the Culture of the Cold War, Interpreting the Theatrical Past (with Tom Postlewait), Theatre & Mind, and Engaging Audiences: A Cognitive Approach to Spectating in the Theatre. He is the co-editor (with F. Elizabeth Hart) of Performance and Cognition: Theatre Studies and the Cognitive Turn and the co-editor (with Blakey Vermeule) of the Palgrave series on Cognitive Studies in Literature and Performance. He has been the President of the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR) and a winner of its Distinguished Scholar Award. He is currently the Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Theatre Arts.

April 19: Peggy Phelan Delivers 2013 Wertheim Seminar in Performance

The Wertheim Seminar in Performance and the Department of English invite interested graduate students to participate in a seminar conducted by Professor Peggy Phelan

“Edward Albee’s The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?”

Friday, April 19 | 10:30-12:00
Distinguished Alumni Room, IMU

This seminar will look more closely at Albee’s play, concentrating in particular on the boundaries around sexual acts and the family. Using a broadly psychoanalytic method, we will consider the genre of theatre in relation to knowing and making public that which may not ever be fully knowable. Questions to be considered: what is fundamentally secret and unknown in sexual acts? What is the family’s interest in maintaining and revealing sexual secrets? How does this relate to the broader culture’s interest in “coming out” on the one hand, and the massively expensive and sophisticated interest in maintaining national and personal secrets on the other?

SPACE IS LIMITED; please RSVP to lcharnes@indiana.edu to attend. Three readings will be made available to participating students in advance of the seminar.

Peggy Phelan

Dr. Peggy Phelan, Stanford University


PEGGY PHELAN is the Ann O’Day Maples Chair in the Arts,  and holds a joint appointment in English and Theatre and Performance Studies at Stanford University.  A leading authority in performance art, her most recent book is the edited volume, Live Art in LA: Performance in Southern California: 1970-83 (Routledge: 2012). Phelan’s other works include Unmarked: The Politics of Performance (1993); Mourning Sex: Performing Public Memories (1997); Acting Out: Feminist Performances (1993); and The Ends of Performance (1998), as well as several co-edited volumes and more than sixty articles and essays in scholarly, artistic, and commercial magazines ranging from Artforum to Signs.

Professor Phelan’s essays have been cited in the fields of architecture, art history, psychoanalytic criticism, visual culture, performance studies, theater studies, and film and video studies. She has been a fellow of the Humanities Institute at the University of California, Irvine and the Australian National University. She served on the Editorial Board of Art Journal, one of three quarterly publications of the College Art Association, and served as Chair of the board. She has been President of Performance Studies International and has been a fellow of the Getty Research Institute and a Guggenheim Fellow.

CMCL’s Joshua Trey Barnett is the (corpo)realities Symposium Essay Prize Winner

We are pleased to announce that Joshua Trey Barnett, MA Student in Indiana University’s Department of Communication & Culture is the winner of the  2013 Indiana University Graduate Symposium on Theatre & Performance Studies Essay Prize. His paper “Photographic Sequences of Transsexual Bodies as Performance” investigated Joshua Riverdale’s “Gender Outlaw: My Physical Evolution on Testosterone,” a 110- photograph sequence of the photographer’s body in various states of somatic transition.

Testosterone

Screenshot from Joshua Riverdale’s FTM Transition Blog, “Gender Outlaw: My Physical Evolution on Testosterone,” the case study at the heart of Barnett’s prize-winning paper.

In his paper presented at the 2013 (corpo)realities conference sponsored by ART@IU, Joshua demonstrates the productive potential of consecutive images to render the prolonged process of transition visible. According to Joshua:

“Riverdale’s photographic sequence straddles the divide between embodied performance and archival documentation, and functions to perform his transition in a coherent way that relies on and refers to the corporeal. This analysis offers a generative framework for re-imagining the relationships between visual rhetoric and performance, representation and performativity, image and flesh.”

The prize comes with recognition in Department of Theatre and Drama’s various publications and a $200 stipend sponsored by the Indiana University Department of Theatre & Drama and ART@IU.

JoshuaTreyBarnett

IU CMCL Student, Joshua Trey Barnett

Joshua Trey Barnett is an associate instructor and graduate student in the Department of Communication and Culture at Indiana University Bloomington. His research program centers on questions of (in)visibility with an emphasis on queer and environmental visual rhetorics. Invisible processes such as climate change, community pollution, and somatic transitions constitute the primary sites of Barnett’s research and attention. He theorizes at the intersections of rhetorical, performance, and critical cultural studies. He is also a photographer and queer activist.