Photos from the 2014 Cultural Indigestion Conference

Everyone enjoyed the 2014 Art@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference. Papers, performances, and a roundtable were held to discuss the importance of intercultural theatre and performance practice. Here are a few pictures of the various events that made the conference successful!

 

Cultural Indigestion Symposium Schedule

ART@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference

ART@IU Cultural Indigestion Conference

Indiana University Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance

Cultural Indigestion
3rd Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies

All events are in the Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center, 275 N. Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405, with the exception of Panel 1 which is located at the Mathers Museum of World Cultures, 416 N. Indiana Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47408. There is free parking across the street from the theatre building, on the upper level of the Jordan Avenue Garage.

Friday, December 12
REGISTRATION AND OPENING EVENTS
3:30 pm-4:30 pm
Registration Table Open……………………………………………….Michaels Lobby

4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Panel 1: Mathers Museum Exhibit Opening – Still/Moving………..……Mathers Museum

6:00 pm-7:30 pm
Catered Dinner………..……………………………………………Lee Norvelle Center

8:00 pm-10:00 pm
Performance 1: Staged Reading of an Adaptation………………………….Studio Theatre
The Poisonwood Bible written and directed by Joe Stollenwerk

Saturday, December 13
BREAKFAST AND DEPARTMENTAL WELCOME
8:45 am-9:20 am
Bagel Breakfast………………….…………………………………….Michaels Lobby

9:20 am-9:25 am
Welcome.………………………………………………………………Studio Theatre
Dr. Ronald Wainscott
Director of Graduate Studies and Head of Theatre History, Theory, and Literature

PANEL PRESENTATIONS

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 2a: Re- and Un-Known Musicals…………………………………………Studio Theatre
1. Capitalism Induced Cannibalization and the Contemporary American Musical Revival of Chicago
Mike Rodriguez, Masters Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
2. When Hell Freezes Over, I’ll Skate: Vinnette Carroll’s Theatrical Melting Pot
Joe Stollenwerk, PhD Candidate in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
3. Singing Multiculturalism; Bilingualism and the 2009 Production of West Side Story
Joshua Robinson, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

9:30 am-10:45 am
Panel 2b: Transgressing Identity………………………….….………………….A 201
1. The Chinatown Cowboy: Re-masculating the Chinese Male Through the Drama of Frank Chin
Whit Emerson, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
2. Transgressive Dramaturgy in Prison-Based Theatre
Julie Rada, Raymond C. Morals Fellow, University of Utah
3. Challenging Gender in Anna and the Tropics
Andres Lopez, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
4. Chewing Up and Spitting Out a New White: Genet, Ward, Parks and the Absurd Terror of Whiteface
Susannah Stengel, Masters Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
11:00 am-12:35 pm
Panel 3: Practical Multiculturalism Roundtable…………………..………………A 201
Moderator: Sara Taylor, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
Panelists: Jennifer Goodlander, Assistant Professor of History,
Theory, and Literature, Indiana University
Mauricio Miranda, MFA Student in Playwriting, Indiana University
Bridgette Dreher, MFA Student in Scenic Design, Indiana University
David Koté, MFA Student in Directing, Indiana University
Caroline Huerta, BFA Student in Musical Theatre, Indiana University

12:45 pm-1:45 pm
Performance 2: Performance of a Translation…………………………….Studio Theatre
I Didn’t Expect Such Humanity by Lucienne Guedes Fahrer
Translated and Directed by Eric “C” Heaps
(mature content – nudity)

1:45 pm-3:00 pm
BREAK FOR LUNCH

3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 4a: Cultural Adaptation and Appropriation…………………………..Studio Theatre
1. War Bonnet: Racist and Sexualized Misappropriation of Native Dress
Emmie Pappa Eddy, Masters Student in Folklore, Indiana University
2. Rediscovering Shakespeare Through Translations
Brennan Murphy, Arts Management and Theatre & Drama Major, Indiana University
3. Thunder God: The Difficulties of Producing Chinese Theatre at an American University
Lucia Xioran Zhu, Theatre & Drama Major, Indiana University
3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Panel 4b: Western Influences in Asia…………………………………….………A 201
1. Post-Colonial Indian Theatre
Jashodhara Sen, M.A. in Theatre Arts, Mumbai University
2. Brecht in China
Weiyu Li, Masters Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University
3. Kim Jong-il on the Invention of Tradition and the Art of Propaganda
Sara Taylor, PhD Student in Theatre & Drama, Indiana University

4:15 pm-4:30 pm
Snack Break………………………………………………………Theatre West Alcove

4:30-4:45 pm
Presentation of Essay Prize…………………………………………….Studio Theatre
Dr. Jennifer Goodlander
Assistant Professor of History, Theory, and Literature, Indiana University

4:45-6:00 pm
Keynote Address
Processo Colaborativo de Criação (Collaborative Process of Creation)……Studio Theatre
Lucienne Guedes Fahrer, Professor of Playwriting, Escola Superior de Artes Celia Helena

6:00-7:30 pm
Dinner Break

7:30-9:00 pm
IU Theatre…………………………..…………………………….Wells-Metz Theatre
In the Red and Brown Water by Tarell Alvin McCraney
Directed by David Koté
Talkback with David Koté and dramaturg Eric “C” Heaps to follow
Keynote Address

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer
lucienneguedes@terra.com.br
Escola Superior de Artes Celia Helena
Professor of Playwriting

Lucienne Guedes Fahrer is a playwright, actor, director, professor, and researcher. She received her first degree from the University of São Paulo (USP) in Theatre with a specialization in Theory of the Theatre (2000) and her Master’s in Theatre (2011), also from USP. As an invited artist for the Teatro de Narradores, Cia., she put on her production of CIDADE CORO – CIDADE FIM – CIDADE REVERSO, as both playwright and co-driector. This production represented Brazil in the Messe Frankfurt in Germany in 2013. She was also an invited actor for Cia. Balagan (under the direction of Maria Thaís Lima Santos) in the project Cabras in 2013. She was a founding actress of Teatro da Vertigem, with whom she has put on the productions O Paraíso Perdido (1992), Apocalipse 1,11 (2000), e A última palavra é a penúltima 2.0 (2014). In 1998 she was invited to be principal of the Free School of Theatre in Santo André. She was an invited professor of the Theatre Department of ECA-USP in 2009, 2010, and 2013 and an invited director for the School of Dramatic Arts at USP in 2014. She is professor of playwriting at the Escola Superior de Artes Celia Helena em São Paulo. She has a wide range of experience in the arts, with an emphasis in playwriting and acting/directing, workign principally in the following areas: the creation process, playwriting, theatrical interpretation, the collaborative process, body techniques, vocal techniques, and performance. Currently she is working on her doctorate at USP under the direction of Sílvia Fernandes (beginning in 2012), with her work focusing on the creative processes in playwriting.

“A restauração e os deslocamentos da narratividade no teatro”
“Restoration and Displacement in the Narrativity of Theatre”

Jennifer Goodlander’s Grad Class T583, Theatre East/West Invites Composer P.Q. Phan to Discuss Intercultural Opera

Jennifer Goodlander's T583 Invites P.Q. Phan to Discuss Intercultural Performance

In the 20th century, as world-travel has become more accessible, theatre has experienced an explosion of cross-influences.  Artists have shared stories, techniques, and especially aesthetics.  This phenomenon of artistic development and sharing is not new – but recently it carries baggage of colonialism, tourism, and differences in economic and political power between “first” and “third” world nations. “Tradition” or “traditional performance” carries a certain value within local and global contexts.

Dr. Jennifer Goodlander’s class, THTR T583: Theatre East/West, examines both Western and Nonwestern performance, and how these performances, and categories of performance, have shaped the practice and teaching of theatre in the 21st century.  The categories of Asian performance, intercultural theatre, and tradition each embody a considerable scope of work—it is not the intention of this class to give a comprehensive or complete overview of any of these topics. Rather this class seeks to introduce the student to a variety of performance genres, practices, and debates so that each student will have the tools to do further research and practice. Goals include attempts to:

  • Develop an understanding and appreciation of traditional theatre genres in Asia.  Our study will focus on aesthetics and story but we will also explore the role that performance plays in Asian cultures.
  • Workshop some of the physical and vocal styles used in traditional Asian theatre.
  • Examine a variety of theatre artists that are forging companies/productions/systems of training with international aesthetics.
  • Understand some of the theoretical models for discussing intercultural theatre practices.
  • Investigate the notion of “tradition” and how it relates to performance in contemporary global societies.
  • Participate in the debate concerning ethics surrounding intercultural performance.
  • Apply our understanding of methods, aesthetics, and theory in papers and creative projects exploring possibilities that emerge when you combine performance traditions from the East and West.